HISTORY

  • Acknowledgment
  • I. The Association of EE Department Heads
    • 1.0 First organization of EE Department Heads: Philadelphia
    • 1.1 1964 AEEDH Annual Meeting: Orono
    • 1.2 Development of the EE Department Heads Association
    • 1.3 EE Department Heads Directory
    • 1.4 Southeastern EE Department Heads
    • 1.5 Further evolution of AEEDH
    • 1.6 Relations with IEEE EAB
    • 1.7 1974 Meetings of AEEDH
    • 1.8 AEEDH Bylaws
    • 1.9 1975 Meetings of AEEDH
    • 1.10 1977 EEDHA Meeting: Champaign
    • 1.11 1978 EEDHA Meeting: Vancouver
    • 1.12 1982 EEDHA Meeting: Columbia
  • II. The Transition to NEEDHA
  • III. 1984-85 Highlights
    • 3.0 Organization
    • 3.1 1984 EEDHA Dinner Meeting at FIE: Philadelphia
    • 3.2 First Annual NEEDHA Meeting: Hilton Head I
    • 3.3 1985 NEEDHA Business Meeting at ASEE: Atlanta
  • IV. 1985-86 Highlights
    • 4.0 Organization
    • 4.1 1985 NEEDHA Dinner Meeting at FIE: Golden
    • 4.2 Second Annual NEEDHA Meeting: Hilton Head II
    • 4.3 1986 NEEDHA Business Meeting at ASEE: Cincinnati
  • V. 1986-87 Highlights
    • 5.0 Organization
    • 5.1 NEEDHA Constitution
    • 5.2 NEEDHA Dinner Meeting at FIE: Arlington
    • 5.3 Third Annual NEEDHA Meeting: Monterey
    • 5.4 1987 NEEDHA Business Meeting at ASEE: Reno
  • VI. 1987-88 Highlights
    • 6.0 Organization
    • 6.1 Fourth Annual NEEDHA Meeting: Orlando
    • 6.2 1988 NEEDHA Business Meeting at ASEE: Portland
  • VII. 1988-89 Highlights
    • 7.0 Organization
    • 7.1 Fifth Annual NEEDHA Meeting: San Diego
    • 7.2 1989 NEEDHA Business Meeting at ASEE: Lincoln
    • 7.3 Harriett Rigas passes away
  • VIII. 1989-90 Highlights
    • 8.0 Organization
    • 8.1 Sixth Annual NEEDHA Meeting: San Juan
    • 8.2 1990 NEEDHA Business Meeting at ASEE: Toronto
  • IX. 1990-91 Highlights
  • 9.0 Organization
    • 9.1 Seventh Annual NEEDHA Meeting: Scottsdale
    • 9.2 1991 NEEDHA Business Meeting at ASEE: New Orleans
  • X. 1991-92 Highlights
    • 10.0 Organization
    • 10.1 Eighth Annual NEEDHA Meeting: Kona
    • 10.2 1992 NEEDHA Business Meeting at ASEE: Toledo
  • XI. Summary of Meetings
  • Appendix I

    1963 Proposal to form Association of EE Department Heads

  • Appendix II

    Attendees at EE Department Heads Meeting,
    June 20, 1963, Philadelphia

  • Appendix III

    1968 List of EE Department Heads
    (compiled by David L. Johnson)

  • Appendix IV

    Departments Represented at First NEEDHA Meeting,
    March 28-29, 1985, Hilton Head, South Carolina

  • Appendix V

    Departments Represented at Seventh NEEDHA Meeting,
    March 15-18, 1991, Scottsdale, Arizona

  • Appendix VI

    Departments Represented at Eighth NEEDHA Meeting,
    March 20-24, 1992, Kona, Hawaii

  • Appendix VII
    Bylaws of the Association of EE Department Heads
    (June 18, 1975)  
  • Appendix VIII

    First NEEDHA Constitution
    (October, 1986)

  • Appendix IX

    Revised NEEDHA Constitution
    (March, 1991)

  • INDEX OF NAMES IN TEXT

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Acknowledgment

Most of this history is derived from minutes and other documents authored by the recording secretaries and other officers of the EE department heads association over the past thirty years. We all owe a debt of gratitude to those dedicated servants of EE education. In particular, on behalf of NEEDHA, I extend our thanks to Billie J. Ball (Mississippi State University) for providing copies of minutes and other records that cover a twenty-year period beginning in 1962 when the Association was first formed. Bill Blackwell (Virginia Tech) also furnished valuable information on the meetings of the EE Department Head's Association during those earlier days. Ed Ernst (formerly at the University of Illinois, now at the University of South Carolina) provided useful comments on the interaction between the Association and the IEEE EAB, as well as between NEEDHA and NEC.

Special recognition is also given to Wayne Bennett (Clemson University) and Roy Mattson (formerly at the University of Arizona, now at the National Technological University). Both Wayne and Roy played key roles in 1984 in expanding the organization to its current form, and both provided especially useful recollections about the sequence of events that led to the formation of NEEDHA. Wayne Bennett has also encouraged me to work on this history, and I thank him for his advice and support.

Thanks are also due to several others who carefully read the first draft and provided corrections. These include Rod Soukup (University of Nebraska), Dave Conner (University of Alabama at Birmingham), and Jim Harris (NSF).

I also extend my thanks to Bob Janowiak and his staff at the National Engineering Consortium in Chicago for printing and distributing this history.

In compiling this volume, I have sought to be complete without being encyclopedic. This version is current to early June 1992 but does not include details of the June 23, 1992 meeting of the ASEE Annual Meeting in Toledo. Details of several of the EE department heads meetings between mid-1960's and 1984 have been omitted, either because minutes were unavailable or because there was repetition of previously covered topics. As in any history, there will certainly be remaining errors of commission and omission that have survived several proof-readings. I would greatly appreciate receiving comments and suggestions for corrections and improvements.

Keith R. Carver
University of Massachusetts at Amherst
NEEDHA Chairman, 1991-92
June 5, 1992

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A History of the National Electrical Engineering Department Heads Association (NEEDHA)

compiled by Keith R. Carver

I. The Association of EE Department Heads

1.0 First organization of EE Department Heads: Philadelphia, 1963

The first national organization of EE department heads was the Association of EE Department Heads, a group whose first meeting was held on June 20, 1963 at the ASEE Annual Conference in Philadelphia. This meeting was organized by William L. Hughes, Head of the School of Electrical Engineering at Oklahoma State University. At the June 1962 ASEE meeting in Colorado Springs, Bill Hughes had been named chairman of a committee to plan the organization of an association of EE department heads. The objectives of this Association as stated by Hughes in a letter dated 14 February 1963 (see Appendix I) were to

  1. act as an advisory group on accreditation matters to the ASEE and the ECPD,
  2. act as an advisory group to the IEEE Professional Group on Education,
  3. act as an independent group to discuss mutual problems on both a regional and national basis, and
  4. provide a method of dissemination of new educational methods and experiments to all participating members.[1]

George B. Hoadley, EE Department Head at North Carolina State University, was elected as national chairman of the Association of EE Department Heads for the 1963-64 academic year. W. B. Boast, EE Department Head at Iowa State University, served as Secretary for the initial organizational meeting in Philadelphia.[2] It was agreed at this first meeting that membership should be extended to schools offering a first degree in electrical engineering. It was also decided that the next annual meeting of the Association of EE Department Heads would be held at the June 1964 ASEE meeting at the University of Maine. A list of the 47 attendees at this initial meeting is presented in Appendix II.

It was also determined by George Hoadley and others that the new Association should have Regional Chairmen in each of the seven IEEE Regions. In 1964, these regional chairmen were:

Region Chairman School
1 G. Dale Sheckels Univ. of Massachusetts (Amherst)
2 Fred B. Haynes Drexel Inst. of Technology (Phila.)
3 Charles Weaver Auburn Univ. (Auburn, Ala.)
4 J. R. Clark Michigan Tech. Univ. (Houghton)
5 Wm. H. Hughes Oklahoma State Univ. (Stillwater)
6 L. Dale Harris Univ. of Utah (Salt Lake City)
7 G. F. Tracy Univ. of Toronto (Toronto)

1.1 1964 AEEDH Annual Meeting: Orono

The second Annual Meeting of the Association of EE Department Heads was held on June 25, 1964 at the ASEE Annual Meeting in Orono, Maine. Glen A. Richardson (Worcester Polytechnic Univ.) presided in the absence of Chairman Hoadley. The meeting was called to order at 8:05 a.m. and there were 58 in attendance. Minutes were recorded by the Secretary of the Association, Roger E. Nolte (Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy).

There were spirited interchanges on the following issues:

  1. staff recruitment,
  2. recruitment of graduate students during visits of department heads to other campuses,
  3. criteria for admission of students to graduate programs,
  4. the 5-year vs. 4-year bachelors programs,
  5. integrated programs vs. historical departmentally organized programs,
  6. the use of digital computers in the educational process. (Are they used to promote insight into various subject matter or just as computational tools ?), and
  7. the attitude of EE Department Heads toward the IEEE and its Student Branch Counselors.

It was moved and passed unanimously to recommend to the IEEE Board of Directors that student members should receive the Spectrum as part of their regular dues payment. It was also moved and passed that the IEEE Student Branches Committee be urged to prepare a statement to be circulated to all EE Department Heads indicating the necessity and importance of giving high priority and encouragement to Student Branch activities.

The meeting adjourned at 10:10 a.m.

1.2 Development of the EE Department Heads Association

In the first eight years following the formation of the Association of EE Department Heads, annual meetings of about two hours length were held in connection with the ASEE Annual Meetings. After the Frontiers in Education (FIE) Conference was formed in 1971, the Association sometimes met there as well. According to information provided by Billie J. Ball (Mississippi State University) and Bill Blackwell (Virginia Tech), some of the early Chairmen were:

1063-64   George B. Hoadley                        North Carolina State Univ. 
1964-65 George B. Hoadley  North Carolina State Univ.
1965-66 William L. Hughes  Oklahoma State Univ.
1966-67 William L. Hughes Oklahoma State Univ. 
1967-68 A. V. Eastman  University of Washington
1968-69 Mac Van Valkenburg Princeton University
1969-70 Wayne H. Chen University of Florida
1970-71    
1971-72 Finley W. "Tex" Tatum Southern Methodist Univ.
1972-73 David L. Johnson Louisiana Tech University
1973-74 Robert F. Cotellessa Clarkson College of Technology
1974-75 Billie J. Ball Mississippi State Univ.
1974-75 Billie J. Ball Mississippi State Univ.
1975-76 W. W. Koepsel Kansas State University
1976-77 Demetrius T. Paris Georgia Inst. of Technology
1977-78 William A. Blackwell Virginia Tech
1978-79 Glen A. Richardson Rose-Hulman Institute
1979-80 Frank S. Barnes University of Colorado
1980-81 J. David Irwin Auburn University
1981-82 Lyle D. Feisel S. Dakota School of Mines
1982-83 Blake E. Cherrington Univ. of Florida
1983-84 William B. Jones Texas A&M
1984-85 Roy H. Mattson Univ. of Arizona

1.3 EE Department Heads Directory

The first Directory of EE Department Heads was prepared by David L. Johnson (Louisiana Polytechnic University) in February 1968, and distributed by him to members of the Association of EE Department Heads. This list of 190 department heads is presented in Appendix III.

In a letter dated October 3, 1969 to EE Department Heads, AEEDH Chairman Wayne Chen (Univ. of Florida) noted that an initial step in establishing better communications in the group would be the publication of "A Directory of EE Departments." He suggested that the directory should cover as many schools as possible, that it should be continued and updated each year, and that the IEEE regions should be identified for use by regional associations of AEEDH. He also urged the inclusion of Graduate Coordinators.

The basis for membership in AEEDH was being listed as a head of a department in this Directory. The AEEDH Directory was published in February of each year, and by the mid-1980's listed 237 departments in the United States and 25 in Canada.

1.4 Southeastern EE Department Heads

A regional association of EE Department Heads from Southeastern schools was organized by Billie J. Ball (Mississippi State University) in 1967. This group held a meeting on May 15-16, 1969 at the Air Host Inn, Atlanta, Georgia, with 14 schools represented: Alabama, Auburn, Christian Brothers, Florida, Georgia Tech, Louisiana State, Mississippi State, North Carolina State, Tennessee, Tennessee A&I, Tennessee Tech, Tuskegee, Virginia Tech and Vanderbilt. Topics discussed were graduate student recruitment, student unrest, engineering program orientation, exchange of faculty between universities, curriculum and information to high schools. The elected officers of this regional group for 1969-71 were William A. Blackwell, Virginia Tech (Chairman) and Wayne H. Chen, Univ. of Florida (Vice-Chairman).

AEEDH, as a national organization, was strongly supported by this Southeastern Association of EE Department Heads (SAEEDH).

1.5 Further evolution of AEEDH

By the mid 1970's, AEEDH was holding two dinner meetings each year, at the ASEE Annual Meeting and at the FIE Conference. AEEDH evolved as a network of communication for organizations with an interest in electrical engineering education. A number of issues of common concern were discussed at EEDHA meetings. However, the structure was insufficiently formal to allow actions to be taken on the various issues discussed.

In a letter dated January 2, 1973 to Robert N. Saunders (Chairman IEEE EAB), David Johnson noted that AEEDH at their June 22, 1972 meeting in Lubbock reaffirmed their desire for a more formal organization, and elected Johnson as chairman of the group, with Bob Cotellessa as vice-chairman and Billie Ball as secretary. He noted that at the Lubbock meeting, there were questions raised as to whether AEEDH should be affiliated with the IEEE EAB, but indicated that he personally hoped that AEEDH could become a part of IEEE. Johnson also noted that he had asked Tex Tatum to serve as chairman of a bylaws committee to draw up a set of bylaws for presentation at the next meeting of AEEDH.

1.6 Relations with IEEE EAB

A topic that served to galvanize AEEDH into a more purposeful, structured organization was the plan by ECPD to offer accreditation of masters level programs with advanced level criteria. As recalled by Ed Ernst (then at the University of Illinois),[3] the EE department heads were caught by surprise, even though ECPD had been developing this plan for some time. The interface to ECPD was through the IEEE and the IEEE Educational Activities Board, and the department heads realized that they needed representation on the EAB. Beginning with the new IEEE year in 1973, the AEEDH Chair was a voting member of the EAB. This continued through 1988 when EAB was reduced in size and much of the representation from educational groups was removed.

In 1973, AEEDH Chairman David L. Johnson was asked by EAB Chairman Robert M. Saunders to serve as a consultant on the EAB. In a poll by Dean Saunders of 45 EE Department Chairs, he found that 62% were opposed to accrediting advanced degrees, 27% were for accreditation at both basic and advanced levels, and 11% had miscellaneous other reactions. In a memo dated May 17, 1973 from AEEDH Chairman Johnson to the IEEE EAB, the AEEDH took a formal position that the accreditation of advanced-level degrees in Electrical Engineering should be dropped.

1.7 1974 Meetings of AEEDH

The EE Department Heads Association met on March 25, 1974 at the Statler Hilton Hotel in New York City, with 25 present.[4] The meeting was called to order at 3:30 p.m. by Chairman Robert F. Cotellessa.
There were three main agenda topics:

  1. advanced-level accreditation,
  2. constitution and by-laws, and
  3. regional groups of the organization.

There was considerable discussion of the advanced-level accreditation topic.

AEEDH met again on June 20 of that year at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N. Y. It was announced by IEEE EAB Chairman Bob Saunders that the Chairman of AEEDH would automatically become an ex-officio member of the EAB. Professor E. C. Jordan (Univ. of Illinois) moved that "At this EE Department Heads meeting at RPI on June 20, 1974, this Association instructs its Chairman to vigorously oppose Advanced-Level Accreditation at the IEEE EAB meeting." AEEDH Chairman Cotellessa proposed that he would make a report on this to the EAB, having spent considerable time in discussion of this matter with EAB members.

George Hoadley, Chairman of the AEEDH Nominating Committee (consisting of Wayne Chen and Dave Johnson), presented a slate of officers for 1974-75: Billie Ball (Chairman), Fred A. Russell (Vice-Chairman) and Wellington Koepsel (Secretary). In a letter dated 10 October, 1974, the new AEEDH Chairman Billie Ball was appointed to the IEEE EAB by Executive Director Donald G. Fink.

1.8 AEEDH Bylaws

By 1975, the AEEDH by-laws committee (F. W. "Tex" Tatum, George B. Hoadley, and W. W. Koepsel) had completed its work and submitted a set of by-laws, presented here in Appendix VII. These by-laws were adopted by AEEDH at their meeting in Fort Collins, Colorado on June 18, 1975.

1.9 1975 Meetings of AEEDH

Officers of AEEDH for 1975-76 were W. W. Koepsel, Kansas State (Chairman), Demetrius T. Paris, Georgia Tech (Vice-Chairman), and William Steirer, Univ. of Southern California (Secretary). Koepsel succeeded Billie Ball as previous Chairman.

AEEDH held its spring meeting in 1975 on April 7 at INTERCON in New York City. There were 29 present. This meeting was called to order by Chairman Billie Ball.
Agenda topics included:

  1. publication of a list of students recommended for graduate study - AEEDH decided not to publish such a list,
  2. plans to hold an Association meeting at the FIE meeting in Atlanta in October,
  3. regional association activities, and
  4. accreditation and certification by ECPD.

The Association held its fall meeting at the FIE Conference in Atlanta on October 21, 1975. There were 36 in attendance. The meeting was called to order by Chairman W. W. Koepsel. Copies were distributed of the report of the ad hoc Accreditation Criterion Study Committee (Floyd B. Cash, C. L. Ben Coates, Irene C. Peden, and Glen A. Richardson, Chm.). This report called for a continuing study of the effects of advanced level accreditation on EE programs. A vote of those present indicated 15 for the position presented in the report, 8 opposed to the report's position, and 5 abstentions. It was announced that the next meeting of the Association would be at the ASEE Annual Meeting, June 14 - 17, at the University of Tennessee.

1.10 1977 EEDHA Meeting: Champaign

The EE Department Heads Association held a dinner meeting on 28 October, 1977 in Champaign, Illinois, in conjunction with the FIE meeting. There were 38 members present. The meeting was opened by EEDHA [5] Chairman W. A. Blackwell. Ed Ernst reported on the recommendations of the Ad Hoc Task Force on Accreditation to EAB.
These included:

  1. the formation of an EAB committee to select and recommend EE visitors for ECPD visiting accreditation teams,
  2. a committee to review and propose changes in accreditation recommendations made by IEEE visitors to assure consistency and compliance with ECPD/IEEE guidelines.

This committee would also be responsible for preparing a manual for ECPD/IEEE visitors, and presenting workshops for new IEEE visitors. Members were primarily concerned about the EAB's Ad Hoc Committee for the Review of (EE) Curricular Guidelines, the initiative for accreditation of advanced EE degrees, and the growth of "Electrical Engineering Technology" programs.

1.11 1978 EEDHA Meeting: Vancouver

The EEDHA held an afternoon meeting on 19 June, 1978 in Vancouver, British Columbia, in conjunction with the ASEE Annual Meeting. There were 43 members present. The meeting was opened by Chairman W. A. Blackwell. The invited speaker was Dr. J. J. Suran, Chairman of IEEE EAB (IEEE Vice-President, Educational Activities), and Manager of GE's Electronics Laboratory at Syracuse, NY. He responded to EEDHA membership concerns about the EAB Committee on Curricular Guidelines, a group made up of members from GE, Westinghouse, IBM, Bell Labs and Magnavox, pointing out that the report would simply be a document for discussion. He argued that every organization can benefit from an examination by outside auditors, and that an accreditation period longer than 6 years would not be in the best interests of the profession. He told the group that he would recommend to the IEEE Board that the push for advanced accreditation be dropped, and offered the opinion that the 4-year engineering technologist is overqualified for a technician job and under qualified for an engineering job.

The Chairman reported that EAB has set up a committee to advise EAB on all matters dealing with accreditation, and that this committee has organized three workshops for new IEEE ad hoc visitors. Glen Richardson reported on proposed changes in the EEDHA bylaws, and a brief discussion followed. The revised bylaws were to be sent out to the membership for a mail ballot. Frank Barnes reported that advanced-level accreditation is not working for EE programs. F. W. Tatum gave a brief history of the EEDHA. (At the Chairman's request, Tex Tatum was working on a written history of EEDHA. He passed away before it was finished.)

The election results for 1978-79 were Glen Richardson, Chairman; Frank Barnes, Vice Chairman, and David Irwin, Secretary.

1.12 1982 EEDHA Meeting: Columbia

The EEDHA met on 18 October, 1982 in Columbia, South Carolina. The after-dinner meeting was called to order at 8:30 p.m. by Chairman Blake Cherrington. The minutes of the last meeting in College Station, Texas were accepted as distributed by secretary Roy Mattson. Blake Cherrington presented an update on the goals of the American Electronics Association. He also handed out an extensive departmental questionnaire prepared by Jim Harris (Head of EE at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo). Edwin Jones presented information about ABET supplemental guidelines for EE, Computer Science and Engineering, and the IEEE/aSME Biomedical Engineering programs. Ed Ernst, IEEE Vice President, reviewed the Hallmarks of Excellence document which had been prepared by Mac Van Valkenburg, Joe Bordogna, and Bruce Eisenstein. The purpose of this document was to identify goals that departments can strive to attain. It was noted that the next Association meeting would be at the Rochester Institute of Technology-sponsored ASEE meeting the week of June 19, 1983. The meeting adjourned at 9:45 p.m.

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II. The Transition to NEEDHA [6]

Wayne Bennett, then EE Chairman at Clemson, became involved in the EE Department Heads Association at the 1981 FIE Conference and began to attend these dinner meetings on a regular basis. Roy Mattson, then EE Chairman at the University of Arizona, also was active in the startup of FIE, and in 1984 was also Chair of the EE Division of ASEE and was Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Education. At the October 1984 FIE meeting, Roy Mattson and Wayne Bennett discussed the EE department heads meetings, concluding that the department heads meetings needed more focus and should be handled separately from ASEE or IEEE. They agreed that there were many common problems to be resolved that required more time for discussion and reflection, as well as opportunities for department heads to talk informally.

Blake Cherrington, formerly Head of EE at the University of Florida and also a past chair of AEEDH, had just begun a two-year NSF assignment in 1984. Roy Mattson and Wayne Bennett approached Blake Cherrington at the 1984 FIE meeting in Philadelphia about the possibility of NSF support for a national 2-day AEEDH meeting. With initial verbal encouragement from Blake Cherrington, Wayne Bennett submitted a proposal to NSF and by December of 1984 had received a verbal OK. On the strength of this verbal commitment from NSF, Wayne Bennett committed to the Mariners Inn in Hilton Head, South Carolina to run a meeting in March of 1985. Bruce Eisenstein was Vice-Chair of AEEDH that year and played a key role in planning the program. In spite of the late notice, the meeting was well attended by department heads and spouses. Roy Mattson made arrangements with Hewlett Packard Foundation (Stan Selby and Emory Rogers) to donate HP 110 portable computers to all EE department heads. Roy Mattson recalls that he was impressed that more than 200 department heads requested an HP 110 computer. The Hilton Head meeting and support from HP gave a cohesion and impetus to the new organization.

In the meantime, Wayne Bennett made arrangements to get several companies to cover much of the cost of receptions, meals and breaks. Most of the NSF money was used to provide travel grants to department heads.

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III. 1984-85 Highlights

3.0 Organization

The officers of AEEDH for 1984-85 were:

Chairman (1984-85): Roy Mattson, University of Arizona
Vice-Chairman (1984-85): Bruce Eisenstein, Drexel University
Secretary-Treasurer (1984-85): Dan Hodge, Virginia Tech

Chairman Roy Mattson appointed an Executive Committee to focus the efforts of the association, comprised of himself, Vice-Chairman Bruce Eisenstein, Secretary-Treasurer Dan Hodge, Dave Conner (Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham) and William B. Jones (Texas A&M University). In a 1984 letter to AEEDH members, Mattson noted that most EE departments were facing large enrollments while having trouble recruiting faculty.

3.1 1984 AEEDH Dinner Meeting at FIE: Philadelphia

AEEDH held a dinner business meeting at the FIE Conference in Philadelphia on October 3, 1984. There were 37 in attendance, representing 34 electrical engineering academic programs. The meeting was called to order at 6:30 p.m. by Chairman Roy Mattson.

Kay Storm (American Electronics Association) presented a report on AEA activities of the past year. She noted that AEA has been active in respect to federal legislation for R&D tax credits, employee educational exemptions, etc. of interest to engineering educators. Maurice Aburdene (Bucknell Univ.) reviewed activities of IEEE student branches and encouraged all departments to participate.

Wayne Bennett (Clemson Univ.) presented a position paper on guidelines for EE education, prepared by an ad hoc committee of the Southeastern Association of EE Department Heads.[7] Blake Cherrington, the new Director of the NSF Division of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering, presented a review of NSF programs and activities. Some discussion followed concerning the shift in NSF emphasis from PI-oriented research to mission-oriented research.

There was addition discussion from the floor indicating an interest in convening more regular AEEDH meetings so that the issues previously discussed could be dealt with more thoroughly. The general sentiment for this was positive, and the possibility of forming an AEEDH Conference will be explored by Wayne Bennett. The meeting was adjourned at 10:00 p.m.

3.2 First Annual NEEDHA Meeting: Hilton Head Island

NEEDHA [8] was in effect inaugurated on March 28 - 29, 1985 at its first national meeting at Hilton Head, South Carolina. This Hilton Head I meeting was attended by 72 individuals representing 61 EE/ECE/EECS departments (see Appendix IV for list of attendees). The theme of this meeting was "Future Directions for Electrical and Computer Engineering Research and Education." The meeting was opened with a plenary session including a welcome by Wayne Bennett, a discussion by Roy Mattson of the background of the new NEEDHA, and a program overview by Bruce Eisenstein.

The remainder of the meeting was organized around three discussion groups and two special-topic sessions:

  • Discussion Group I: Industry-university interaction
    Coordinated by Emory Rogers (HP), Dr. Satogopan (IBM), Don Dinsel (Dupont) and Dan Hodge (Virginia Tech)

This group made the following conclusions:

  1. Much closer interaction is needed between industry and universities.
  2. Universities need to adopt industrial style planning cycles and seek help from industry on long-range planning.
  3. Industry needs to become more active in supporting the equipment and laboratory needs of electrical and computer engineering departments.
  4. There is an immediate need to develop a national computer network for department heads to facilitate interaction and sharing of faculty and graduate student resources.
  • Discussion Group II: Responding to regional and national needs
    Coordinated by Blake Cherrington (NSF), Ray Morrison (Georgia Tech Advisory Council), and Paul Losleben (Dept. of Defense).

This group concluded:

  1. Universities need to better document their role in economic development and international competitiveness.
  2. Universities need to work more closely with industry in key areas of technology. Centers and focused research programs are encouraged.
  3. There is a need for regional consortia to share critical resources and stimulate joint industry-university research programs.
  4. Organizations such as NEEDHA need to become more actively involved in state and regional politics.
  • Discussion Group III: University-university interaction
    Coordinated by Woody Everett (SCEEE), Bradley Strait (Syracuse University), Billie Ball (Mississippi State University) and Jim Harris (Cal Poly at San Luis Obispo).

This group recommended that universities should:

  1. Enhance the sharing of their library, computer and instructional resources in their region.
  2. Form research program consortia around lead institutions.
  3. Cooperate on continuing education programs, faculty exchanges and faculty development.
  4. Focus additional effort on the formation of interdisciplinary centers for research and graduate instruction.
  • Special Topics Group I: Personal computers in EE education
    Coordinated by Dan Hodge (Virginia Tech) and Bruce Eisenstein (Drexel).

Case histories were provided where personal computers were being used in ECE education and methods of office automation in departmental administration.

  • Special Topics Group II: Computer engineering curricula and ECE Department Heads national network
    Coordinated by Jim Leathrum (Clemson Univ.) and Ed White (Univ. of Virginia)

The computer engineering curriculum discussion addressed the evolution in computer engineering curricula and the new ABET criteria for accrediting computer engineering programs. Plans were also made to organize electronic communication among ECE department heads as a subgroup on CompMail.

  • Action Items from First Annual Meeting:
  1. The attendees agreed that plans should be developed for holding an annual meeting of the National EE Department Heads similar to this planning conference.
  2. Agreement was also reached that a national computer network (e-mail) of EE department heads should be instituted. It was noted the Hewlett-Packard Co., through the action of Emory Rogers, was providing personal portable computers to the heads and chairs of approximately 250 accredited ECE departments in the U.S., thus facilitating the creation of this network.
  3. It was resolved that a position paper should be developed on the allocation of resources to electrical and computer engineering departments.
  4. It was also resolved to evaluate the organizational structure of the National EE Department Heads Association with the aim of increasing its effectiveness.

3.3 1985 AEEDH Business Meeting at ASEE: Atlanta

NEEDHA held its summer business meeting on June 19, 1985 at the ASEE Annual Meeting in Atlanta, Georgia. There were 62 people in attendance, representing 60 departments. Chairman Roy Mattson called the meeting to order at 8:00 a.m., and summarized activities of the past year, including the initiation of an NEEDHA Executive Committee, a newsletter, plans for a two-day meeting at Hilton Head, and an HP-110 grant program.

Ed Parrish (Univ. of Virginia) described an electronic mail (e-mail) system using CompMail+. It was suggested by him that department heads and graduate committee chairmen sign up for this service, which costs about $5 to $15 per month. It was also suggested that user IDs be included in the AEEDH directory.

Wayne Bennett (Clemson) reported on the Hilton Head (I) meeting, noting that there were 72 attendees from 32 states and 2 from Canada. It was noted that the meeting had been quite successful.

Jim Harris (Cal Poly at San Luis Obispo) reviewed eight resolutions generated at the Hilton Head meeting. An extensive discussion of Resolution No. 5 having to do with the Southeastern Association of EE Department Heads (SAEEDH) position paper on guidelines for EE education. The distinctions between the SAEEDHA paper, the Hallmarks of Excellence and the ABET criteria were noted.

Two new resolutions were introduced and discussed, the first concerned with the discontinuance by NSF of their Research Initiation Grant program and the second the establishment of an ABET requirement for minimum EE faculty size.

Cy Tunis, Vice President of IEEE and Chairman of the IEEE EAB, made a brief presentation to the group. He noted that although NEEDHA is actively supported by the IEEE, NEEDHA is not itself a formal part of the IEEE.

Nominations for the position of NEEDHA Secretary Treasurer were opened. Bruce Eisenstein (Drexel) was rotated to the position of Chairman and Dan Hodge (Virginia Tech) became Vice-Chairman. Jim Rowland (Univ. of Kansas) was nominated for the position of Secretary, and nominations were closed. Jim Rowland was elected by acclamation.

An expression of gratitude to Roy Mattson for his activities during the past year was approved by acclamation. It was noted that the next NEEDHA meeting would be held at the October 1985 FIE Conference in Golden, Colorado.

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IV. 1985-86 Highlights

4.0 Organization

The officers for NEEDHA for this year were:

Chairman (1985-86): Bruce Eisenstein, Drexel University
Vice-Chairman (1985-86): Dan Hodge, Virginia Tech
Secretary-Treasurer: Jim Rowland, Univ. of Kansas

4.1 1985 NEEDHA Dinner Meeting at FIE: Golden

NEEDHA held a dinner meeting at the FIE Conference in Golden, Colorado (Denver Marriott West Hotel) on October 21, 1985. Chairman Bruce Eisenstein called the meeting to order at 6:30 p.m. Past Chairman Roy Mattson (Univ. of Arizona) reviewed NEEDHA activities for 1985, including the first annual meeting at Hilton Head, the initiation of a newsletter,[9] the acquisition of HP 110 portable computers, and the use of the CompMail+ e-mail system.

The minutes of the June 19, 1985 meeting in Atlanta were approved and distributed by Dan Hodge (Virginia Tech).

Wayne Bennett announced that he would be handling local arrangements for the second annual NEEDHA meeting in March 1986 at Hilton Head, S.C. Jim Harris announced that 39 responses had been received on the mail ballot recently distributed regarding resolutions made at Hilton Head I and at Atlanta/aSEE. These indicating a large majority in favor of a second NEEDHA annual conference, for instituting a CompMail+ e-mail network, an NSF national computer network, a one-page questionnaire, for a reinvigorated NSF Research Initiation Grant program, and for several other resolutions.

Dave Conner (Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham) reported that Bruce Eisenstein would submit the Southeastern EEDHA paper [10] to the IEEE Educational Activities Board (EAB) for use as a possible position paper. Roy Mattson reported that the University of Arizona has had experience with a non-majors program since 1980.

Jim Harris inquired whether NEEDHA might want to include computer science department heads, and whether the NEEDHA name and charter might need to be changed and broadened. He suggested that NEEDHA consider ABET-accredited computer science and computer engineering programs.

Members were requested to send requests for CompMail+ service directly to Ed Parrish (Univ. of Virginia). Bruce Eisenstein indicated he would ask IEEE EAB to provide funds to pay for future CompMail+ costs.

Lou Riemenschneider (South Dakota School of Mines & Technology) announced that the computer program for the NEEDHA survey of departments had been rewritten, with 270 questionnaires mailed; 70 returns had been received as of October 21. Bruce Eisenstein asked Lou to work with Keith Carver (Univ. of Massachusetts) and Virgil Ellerbruch (South Dakota State University) to prepare a revised questionnaire.

4.2 Second Annual NEEDHA Meeting: Hilton Head II

A follow-on proposal to hold a second meeting at Hilton Head was funded by NSF in the fall of 1985. This led to the second annual NEEDHA meeting, Hilton Head II, which was held March 12 - 14, 1986 at The Hyatt Regency Hotel. This was an even bigger success than the first, with approximately 100 heads or chairs in attendance.

The meeting was highlighted by five sessions:

  • Session I: NSF programs and policies
    The lead-off speaker for this session was Frank Huband, then Director of the Electrical, Communications and Systems Division at NSF. After a presentation by Dr. Huband on current activities at NSF as they affected NEEDHA members, there was considerable discussion of the need for additional support for individual investigators, as well as the then newly-proposed restructuring of NSF and formation of a CISE directorate separate from the Engineering Directorate. There was also concern among several present that the NSF Center programs would dilute funding to individual investigators.
  • Session II: New issues in accreditation
    This session was led by Harriett Rigas, then Chair of EE at the Naval Postgraduate School. She discussed recent changes in accreditation criteria and their impact on electrical and computer engineering. The "capstone" design requirement, documentation of laboratory equipment and support and the rapid decline of programs receiving a full 6V accreditation were among key issues.
  • Session III. Federal research programs and policies
    Bill Herrold, Manager of the IEEE Technology Activities Council in Washington, D.C., led a discussion of recent changes in federal policies regarding research programs. Much of this discussion focused on changing funding patterns and how ECE programs would be impacted.
  • Session IV. Industry-university research partnerships
    Keith Carver, ECE Head at the University of Massachusetts, led a discussion on industry-university research partnerships. This discussion was based on presentations of successful programs with much of the discussion focusing on how to initiate such partnerships.
  • Session V. IEEE Education Activities Board initiatives
    Cyril J. Tunis, Vice-President of the IEEE Educational Activities Board (EAB) discussed recent EAB initiatives. He highlighted EAB efforts to develop continuing education and renewal programs for practicing engineers.

In addition to these topical sessions, the Hilton Head II meeting included a NEEDHA business meeting, with the following topics drawing considerable discussion:

  1. The tendency of corporations to provide more support to electrical engineering departments high on the list of federal funding was noted. Bruce Eisenstein suggested that corporations should be encouraged to return dollars to those schools which benefit them.
  2. A report on the progress with EE department head network via Compmail suggested that the group should switch to BitNet as a means of communication.
  3. The number of schools responding to the survey of EE departments has declined in recent years and departments were encouraged to participate. It was noted that there were an average of 14.3 faculty vacancies per 100 faculty in ECE departments.

At the business meeting, Dan Hodge led a discussion on how to improve the effectiveness of NEEDHA and presented proposed revisions to the by-laws, based on the original bylaws adopted June 18, 1975 by AEEDH and presented in Appendix VII.

The revisions were reviewed with the understanding that additional discussion would be scheduled for later meetings of the organization.

Several action items grew out of this business meeting:

  1. Plans for a third annual meeting to be held in Monterey, California were developed. It was felt that this would help share travel costs with western schools. Harriett Rigas, then EE Chair at the Naval Postgraduate School, offered to host this meeting.
  2. A position paper on guidelines for ECE education as adopted by NEEDHA in October 1985 was distributed.
  3. A resolution was passed calling for the preservation of the integrity and focus of electrical engineering as a discipline in the NSF Engineering Directorate.
  4. The Vice-Chairman of NEEDHA should be assigned the job of planning for the next year's Annual Meeting.

4.3 1986 NEEDHA Business Meeting at ASEE: Cincinnati

NEEDHA held its 1986 summer business meeting at the ASEE conference in Cincinnati, June 25, 1986. Chairman Bruce Eisenstein called the breakfast meeting to order at 7:00 a.m.

Dan Hodge reported that the proposed by-laws had been distributed at the Southeastern EEDHA meeting in April and some comments had been received. A mail ballot on the by-laws would be distributed, with the results processed before the FIE conference in October.

Wayne Bennett reported on the 1986 Hilton Head meeting. Chairman Eisenstein voiced the opinion of all present that Wayne Bennett had done a magnificent job in arranging for the 1985 and 1986 annual meetings. Harriett Rigas volunteered to work with Jim Freeman and Jim Harris on arranging the next annual meeting in Monterey, California.

Jim Harris indicated that he would like to use CompMail+ to distribute the newsletter directly to department heads. Bruce Eisenstein noted that this would be effective only if a sufficient number of heads were logging onto CompMail+.

Bruce Eisenstein reviewed the NEEDHA survey, and indicated that he would like to combine the information form being sent out each year with the salary form, a separate request. He proposed to publish the survey results as part of the annual directory of EE departments.

An election of new officers was held. The current vice-chairman, Dan Hodge, automatically became Chairman for the coming year and Jim Rowland rotated to the Vice-Chairman position. Wayne Bennett was elected by acclamation to become the new Secretary. This office will become Secretary-Treasurer when the proposed new by-laws have been approved.

Incoming Chairman Hodge thanked outgoing Chairman Eisenstein for a very effective job and noted some major accomplishments during the past year. He listed his goals for the coming year as continuing the emphasis on computer networking, increasing efforts for securing funding for the annual meeting, pressing forward with political lobbying, and taking more advantage of the Executive Committee in a structured formal way.

Charles Slivinksy (Univ. of Missouri, Columbia) reported some information on the Association of Computer Science and Engineering Chairs (ASCEC). This organization, composed of ABET or CSAB-accredited chair/heads of computer science or computer engineering programs, intends to meet in Dallas at a computer conference this fall. Slivinksy also noted that the IEEE student magazine, Potentials, was being circulated to 50,000 students.

The fall meeting was scheduled to be held in Arlington, Texas at the FIE Conference. The meeting adjourned at 10:15 a.m.

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V. 1986-87 Highlights

5.0 Organization

The NEEDHA officers for this year were:

Chairman (1986-87): Dan Hodge (Virginia Tech)
Vice-Chairman (1986-87): Jim Rowland (Univ. of Kansas)
Secretary-Treasurer (1986-87): Wayne Bennett (Clemson Univ.)

5.1 NEEDHA Constitution

In early September, 1986, Chairman Dan Hodge distributed to EE Department Heads a draft NEEDHA Constitution. This Constitution, presented in Appendix VIII, was based on the earlier AEEDH Bylaws drafted by the F. W. Tatum committee and first adopted by AEEDH in 1975 (Appendix VII). The new NEEDHA Constitution provided for the establishment of annual member dues, and also established a category of Affiliate Membership for industrial firms and other organizations having a strong interest in electrical engineering education.

5.2 NEEDHA Dinner Meeting at FIE: Arlington

A NEEDHA dinner meeting was held on October 14, 1986 at the FIE Conference in Arlington, Texas. 40 EE department/programs were represented at this meeting. Chairman Dan Hodge called the meeting to order, and the minutes of the previous NEEDHA summer meeting in Cincinnati (ASEE) were approved. Dan Hodge announced that the Executive Committee for the coming year would consist, in addition to himself, of Jim Rowland (Vice-Chairman), Wayne Bennett (Secretary/Treasurer), Bruce Eisenstein (first past Chairman), Roy Mattson (second past Chairman), George Peterson (member-at-large) and Jim Harris (member-at-large).

Dan Hodge reported on responses to proposed changes in the by-laws/constitution, including a sizable majority in favor of a provision for annual dues. He noted that he is preparing an electronic mail list and urged members to submit their e-mail addresses on BitNet, ArpaNet or CompMail+. He also reported that letters have been sent to a number of companies requesting support for the third annual NEEDHA meeting in Monterey. He reminded those present that they would need to elect a new secretary-treasurer at the June ASEE meeting in Reno.

Harriett Rigas briefed the group on plans for third annual NEEDHA meeting in Monterey, indicating that the conference would be held at the Doubletree Inn.

A good portion of the meeting was spent identifying issues that should be placed on the agenda for the NEEDHA meeting in Monterey. Another item of discussion at the FIE meeting was the recommended NEEDHA resolution to the National Science Board, having to do with the need for major new funding for the NSF to be applied to the restructuring and upgrading of undergraduate engineering education.

5.3 Third Annual NEEDHA Meeting: Monterey

The third Annual NEEDHA Meeting was held March 15 - 17, 1987 in Monterey, California at the Doubletree Hotel. The meeting was hosted by the U. S. Naval Postgraduate School. Harriett Rigas, in charge of local arrangements, opened the formal program at 8:30 a.m. The meeting was well attended with 95 departments represented and 41 spouses.

At the opening session, Harriett Rigas introduced Admiral Austin, Superintendent of the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, who gave a brief overview of the institution. Jim Rowland, NEEDHA Vice President and Program Chairman, then gave an overview of the conference program.

Dan Hodge, NEEDHA Chairman, chaired the NEEDHA business session, noting the importance of the association and the need to document past NEEDHA activities. He also reviewed the revision of the NEEDHA constitution, the restoration by NSF of their research initiation grants and a position paper on Guidelines for Resource Allocation to ECE Departments. Wayne Bennett, NEEDHA Secretary-Treasurer, presented a budget report, noting contributions of $5700 from DuPont, Tektronix, GE, Westinghouse, Corning, DEC and IBM in support of this third Annual Meeting. Dan Hodge indicated that a tentative agreement had been reached with the Southeastern Center for Electrical Engineering Education in St. Cloud, Florida to serve as a depository for NEEDHA funds. After a discussion of membership dues, a rate of $100 was moved and passed. The importance of regional groups of EE department heads was noted by Dan Hodge, and he suggested that regional groups bring their issues to the national spring meeting for discussion.

Harriett Rigas then lead a workshop on electronic mail, in which the attributes of various networks were discussed. It was concluded that BitNet was probably most appropriate for NEEDHA.

The luncheon speaker for the first day was Robert F. Watson, Head of the NSF Office of College Science Instrumentation. He outlined recent changes in the NSF, emphasizing the need for greater faculty focus on undergraduates and the restructuring of the curriculum.

The first afternoon session was on the topic of Concerns in Undergraduate EE Education and was moderated by Dave Conner (University of Alabama at Birmingham). Presentations were made by Virgil Ellerbruch (South Dakota State Univ.), Demos Gelopulos (Valpariso), and Jim Harris (Cal Poly at San Luis Obispo). Following these presentations, there was a straw poll indicating that 31 of 95 departments represented had some type of grade point ratio admission requirement. In addition, 13 of the 95 departments indicated that they include a teaching requirement for individuals on graduate assistantships. After a discussion of communication skills problems for foreign-born teaching assistantships, a show of hands indicated that 34 institutions of the 95 were conducting some type of faculty in-class evaluation of foreign TA's. Another informal poll was conducted to determine how much practical industrial experience was represented by EE department heads. The results were that 11 EE department heads had 10 years or more industrial experience, 18 heads had 6 to 10 years experience, 46 heads had 5 years or less experience, and only 4 heads had no industrial experience at all.

The second afternoon session on March 16 was a panel discussion, moderated by Jerry Mendel (Univ. of Southern California) on the topic "How Do We Get Citizens in Graduate Studies?" Other panelists were Jose Cruz, Ken Laker, Dick Schwartz and Len Shaw. Suggestions included provisions for supplemental fellowships, improving the image of academic careers, summer research programs between junior and senior years, etc. A second issue concerned research support and the trend toward large center programs. A third issue of discussion was whether the thesis requirement was effective, and a fourth topic was recruiting quality faculty. A straw poll indicated t hat PhD Fellowships ranged from $6000 to $10,000, with a median value in the $8000 - $9000 range.

The NEEDHA Banquet was held on the evening of March 16 at the Monterey Bay Aquarium, and was preceded by a reception.

The first morning session on March 17 was on the topic of accreditation; this session was chaired by Harriett Rigas, who noted that there were two major accreditation issues:

  1. the increased emphasis on design, particularly the unrealistic expectation that a senior capstone design experience would incorporate all areas of the curriculum, and
  2. recent proposals to drastically decrease the representation of the IEEE, and ECE departments, in ABET.

George Peterson discussed the response to recent questions about the impact of changes in accreditation criteria.

The second morning session was chaired by Bill Siebert, who made a presentation on the ASEE sponsored program for lifelong education of engineering faculty. He noted that the need for lifelong learning is greater than ever and reported on a recent meeting at MIT attended by approximately 50 people representing thirty universities and colleges. He noted that six ASEE summer courses for faculty were being planned for the summer of 1987.

The third morning session, chaired by Wayne Bennett, was on the topic of teaching effective technical communications to engineering students. He reviewed a program at Clemson University, based on oral, written and graphic communications, and noted that the self-paced manual they use can be obtained from the Clemson ECE Department.

The luncheon session on the second day of the meeting featured Dianna Smiley of Tektronix, one of the NEEDHA corporate sponsors. Dave Irwin (Auburn University) and John Butler (Northwestern University) each won $10,000 worth of Tektronix equipment for their departments.

The first afternoon session of the day was moderated by Bruce Eisenstein and was on the topic of increased interaction between industry and universities. Other panelists were Al Jones (DEC), Luke Nogel (Westinghouse Electric Corp.), and Keith Carver (University of Massachusetts). Both industrial representatives stressed that industry is moving toward closer relationships with fewer schools and a careful evaluation of the results. In the discussion after this panel, several individuals noted that value of industrial advisory boards and the importance of corporate support of projects.

The final Tuesday session led to several resolutions adopted by vote of the membership, and summarized here:

  1. NEEDHA expressed its appreciation and gratitude to the IEEE EAB,
  2. NEEDHA supports in principle the changes to the ABET engineering science/design criteria proposed by the EAC,
  3. NEEDHA strongly recommends that the NSF programs in undergraduate education place special emphasis on undergraduate EE education,
  4. NEEDHA emphatically endorses IEEE efforts to assure appropriate representation for EE within ABET, and
  5. NEEDHA recommends that the policies concerning the taxation of graduate assistantship stipends and tuition in effect prior to December 31, 1986 be continuing.

This third annual NEEDHA meeting was concluded at 4:30 p.m. on March 17, 1987.

5.4 1987 NEEDHA Business Meeting at ASEE: Reno

The 1987 NEEDHA Business Meeting was held on June 24, 1987 at the ASEE Annual Meeting in Reno, Nevada. The meeting was called to order at 8:30 a.m. by Chairman Dan Hodge. He announced that the next NEEDHA meeting would be at the FIE Conference on October 26 at 5:30 p.m. Wayne Bennett presented the treasurer's report and the minutes of the last meeting.

An election of officers was held, with Harriett Rigas, newly appointed department head at Michigan State, elected by acclamation as NEEDHA secretary-treasurer. Other NEEDHA officers for 1987-88 are Jim Rowland, Chairman and Wayne Bennett Vice-Chairman.

Dan Hodge announced that the organization is moving to BitNet and that department heads should become active on the e-mail network. Dan then recognized Jim Rowland as the new NEEDHA chairman for 1987-88.

Jim Rowland thanked Dan Hodge for his year of service and introduced Dr. Nam Suh, Associate Director of the Engineering Directorate at NSF. Dr. Suh gave a brief overview of NSF activities as they relate to engineering, noting that NSF plans to double funds for individual investigators, emphasize design and manufacturing, increase support for undergraduate engineering education, continuing to stress engineering research centers, and look to global issues.

Jim Harris then gave a report on the NSF Workshop on Undergraduate Education. He indicated that this activity had been very successful and that a report would be distributed. Additional related presentations on this workshop were made by Dave Conner, Kevin Clements and Buck Brown.

Jim Rowland announced that George Peterson and Jim Harris would continue to serve on the NEEDHA Executive Committee as members at large. The meeting concluded with a commendation for Dan Hodge for his year of service as NEEDHA Chairman. The meeting adjourned at 12:05 p.m.

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VI. 1987-88 Highlights

6.0 Organization

The NEEDHA officers for this year were:

Chairman (1987-88): Jim Rowland, Chairman (Univ. of Kansas)
Vice-Chairman (1987-88): Wayne Bennett (Clemson Univ.)
Secretary-Treasurer (1987-88): Harriett Rigas (Michigan State Univ.)

6.1 Fourth Annual NEEDHA Meeting: Orlando

The fourth Annual NEEDHA Meeting was held March 6 - 8, 1988 at the Holiday Inn - Crowne Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. There were 118 departmental representatives in attendance at this meeting, hosted by the Southeastern Center for Electrical Engineering Education and the Southeastern Association of EE Department Heads.

At the opening plenary session on March 7, attendees were welcomed by Woody Everett, Director of SCEEE. Wayne Bennett gave a brief overview of the program and Jim Rowland reviewed a few brief business items.

The first morning session on March 7 was on the topic of Curriculum Issues and was chaired by Dave Conner. Other panelists were John Field (Univ. of Maine), Ed Pierson (Purdue - Calumet), George Sackman (SUNY Binghamton), Ron Klein (Univ. of West Virginia), Victor Gerez (Montana State) and Narayana Rao (Univ. of Illinois).

The second session was on the topic of ABET Accreditation and was moderated by George Peterson (Naval Academy, Annapolis). Other panelists were Harold Marton (North Carolina A&T), Ed Jones (Iowa State), Roger Messenger (Florida Atlantic) and Al Claytor (Air Force).

The first afternoon session was on NSF and Federal Programs and was moderated by Ed Ernst, then at NSF.

This was followed by a session on state and national issues, moderated by Dan Hodge (Virginia Tech). Perspectives on the Texas situation were given by Marion Hagler (Texas Tech) and the Florida situation (Bob Sullivan).

Another session was held on the development of EE departments; this was chaired by J. O. Kopplin (Iowa State). The College perspective was given by Wayne Chen (Univ. of Florida) and on the University perspective by Gary Ransdell (Clemson Univ.).

The first day was capped by a presentation by Tektronix Inc. of door prizes of equipment valued at $20,000.

The NEEDHA banquet that evening featured a talk on challenges to engineering education by Paul Torgerson, Dean of Engineering at Virginia Tech.

The second day of the meeting (March 8) began with a panel session on departmental resources, with Dan Hodge speaking on the NEEDHA electronic network, Wayne Bennett on the NEEDHA resource survey and William Siebert (MIT) on ASEE summer programs of faculty development.

The meeting was concluded with a business session, conducted by Chairman Jim Rowland. One important outcome of this business meeting was the decision to seek a nationally based organization that could serve as the secretariat for NEEDHA. NEEDHA requested that the National Engineering Consortium consider assuming office/administrative services for NEEDHA. Also financial support was requested.

Following the March 1988 Orlando business meeting, Ed Ernst asked several of the officers and NEEDHA board members if they would be interested in having the National Engineering Consortium serve as secretariat/administrative office for NEEDHA. On August 17, 1988 there was a meeting at NEC in Chicago of the NEEDHA officer group and several from the NEC Board of Directors. The Consortium's Board of Directors approved the relationship and commitment of financial support to NEEDHA on October 3, 1988. Subsequently Wayne Bennett handled the final agreement details and the Consortium began managing NEEDHA affairs. NEEDHA was incorporated as a 501(c)(3) organization on August 29, 1989.

6.2 1988 NEEDHA Business Meeting at ASEE: Portland

The summer NEEDHA Business Meeting was held June 22, 1988 at the ASEE Annual Meeting in Portland, Oregon. Chairman Jim Rowland convened the meeting, and circulated the EE Department directory for review and correction. Minutes of the Orlando meeting, earlier circulated by mail, were approved. Treasurer Harriett Rigas reported that $18,600 had been collected in dues and deposited with SCEEE. It was decided that dues should be collected in the fall for a January 1, 1989 - December 30, 1989 membership. A motion was made, second and passed unanimously that dues for the coming year be $100. It was decided that Hewlett Packard Company and Tektronix be added to the list of NEEDHA affiliates because of their hardware donations.

Woody Everett of SCEEE reported on arrangements made for the Spring 1989 meeting in San Diego. Bruce Eisenstein moved (seconded by Harriett Rigas) that the Executive Committee develop budgets for future conferences, including the setting of subsidy from dues; this passed unanimously. This was followed by a discussion of potential sites for the 1990 Spring meeting, including Puerto Rico, St. Thomas and New Orleans. Tom Kanneman, Chair of the EE Department at the University of San Diego, volunteered to serve as local contact for the Spring 1989 meeting in San Diego.

Jim Rowland reported on the June 4 meeting of the IEEE EAB. Harriett Rigas recommended that NEEDHA ask EAB to circulate to the Education Society and NEEDHA any changes being contemplated for ABET criteria.

Dan Hodge reported from the nominating committee that Bob Sullivan (University of Florida) had been recommended as the Secretary/Treasurer. It was moved by Dave Irwin and seconded by Bruce Eisenstein that the nominations be closed; the motion passed by acclamation. Jim Rowland then turned over the meeting to Wayne Bennett, as incoming Chairman. Bennett outlined his goals for NEEDHA for the coming year.

Ed Ernst reported on educational activities at NSF, noting that George Peterson had recently joined NSF replacing Anita LaSalle. Ed noted that the new NSF program for curriculum development had $2 M for engineering and $1 M for mathematics.

Roy Mattson, Academic Vice President at NTU, stated that they had 1500 students with 350 admitted to a degree. The National Technological University was offering five degrees at the masters level.

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VII. 1988-89 Highlights

7.0 Organization

The officers for 1988-89 were:

Chairman (1988-89): Wayne Bennett (Clemson Univ.)
Vice-Chairman (1988-89): Harriett Rigas (Michigan State)
Secretary-Treasurer (1988-89): Bob Sullivan (Univ. of Florida)

7.1 Fifth Annual NEEDHA Meeting: San Diego

The fifth annual NEEDHA meeting was held March 19 - 21, 1989 at the Kona Kai Beach and Tennis Resort in San Diego, California. Organization of this meeting was coordinated by Chairman Wayne Bennett, and local arrangements were made by Bob Janowiak and his staff at the National Engineering Consortium. NEC did an outstanding job with these meeting arrangements, and there was record attendance of 160 department heads.

The meeting began on Sunday evening March 19 with an informal reception and buffet dinner at the Kona Kai. This was followed by a departmental administrative seminar, primarily for new chairs or heads, coordinated by Dave Conner.

The formal program was initiated on Monday morning, March 20 with a welcome from Chairman Wayne Bennett and NEC Executive Director Bob Janowiak. The first session, moderated by Jerry Mendel (Univ. of Southern California) was on the topic of "Computer Engineering and the Electrical Engineering Department." Other panelists included Gene Wong (University of California - Berkeley), Keith Carver (University of Massachusetts - Amherst), Ed Davidson (University of Michigan), Steve Director (Carnegie Mellon University), and George Bekey (University of Southern California). This panel discussed, among other things, the issue of whether computer science and computer engineering should be combined with electrical engineering (e.g., EECS departments at MIT or University of California at Berkeley), or with computer science separated from electrical and computer engineering, or other such combinations. There was no unanimity of opinion on this, given the diversity of current models at various universities.

The second session was moderated by George Peterson (NSF) on the topic of "NSF Programs in Undergraduate Education."

The lunch speaker was Frank Splitt, Vice President of Technology Planning at Northern Telecom Inc. He spoke on the topic of "Industrial Needs of the Engineer of the 21st Century."

After lunch, the attendees separated into two discussion groups, organized by Small Schools and Large Schools. The moderator for the Small Schools group was Buck Brown (Rose Hulman Institute of Technology), and other panelists were Martin Roden (Cal State Los Angeles), Naim Kheir (Oakland University), and Edgar Luecke (Valpariso University). The moderator for the Large Schools group was Dave Irwin (Auburn University), with additional panelists Bob Collins (University of Minnesota), E. Kamen (University of Pittsburgh), Jose Cruz (Univ. of California, Irvine) and Rod Soukup (University of Nebraska).

After these groups met, each moderator reported general findings back to the plenary session. This was followed by a short NEEDHA Business Meeting, moderated by Chairman Wayne Bennett, in which issues were introduced for full discussion on the following day.

The first full day was capped by a reception and luau. The second day began with a session on "New Issues in Accreditation" organized by George Peterson of NSF. This was followed by another NEEDHA Business Meeting, in which a number of resolutions were introduced. At the lunch meeting on the second day, Jack Marshall of Tektronix presented door prize awards. The fifth NEEDHA Annual Meeting was adjourned at 1:30 p.m.

7.2 1989 NEEDHA Business Meeting at ASEE: Lincoln

The summer 1989 NEEDHA Business Meeting was held June 28, 1989 at the ASEE Annual Meeting in Lincoln, Nebraska. The meeting was called to order by Chairman Wayne Bennett at 9:30 a.m. Bob Sullivan gave the treasurer's report and a summary of efforts to consolidate funds in the NEC account. Nominations for secretary/treasurer were solicited in addition to the nomination of Rod Soukup by the Board of Directors. With no other nominations made, the new NEEDHA officers for 1989-90 were thus Harriett Rigas (Chair), Bob Sullivan (Vice-Chairman) and Rod Soukup (Secretary/Treasurer). After being handed the gavel by Wayne Bennett, incoming Chairperson Rigas called for a round of applause to recognize Wayne Bennett's dedicated service and commitment to NEEDHA.

Harriett Rigas also recognized Ed Ernst, ABET President, to discuss NEC and its relationship with NEEDHA. It was noted that NEEDHA has become much more effective with NEC's help in handling operating details. She announced that the 1990 meeting would be held in Puerto Rico, and the 1992 meeting would be in Phoenix. Bob Sullivan asked the attendees for suggestions for program items for the San Juan meeting. After a discussion on the issue, a majority of 21 to 4 indicated that two meetings per year were preferred, one the NEEDHA Annual Meeting and the second a business meeting at the ASEE Annual Meeting.

A motion was made, seconded and approved to hold a NEEDHA-sponsored dinner at the upcoming FIE meeting in Vienna and to invite European guests. The IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society has expressed interest in getting NEEDHA cooperation to disseminate electromagnetics software, through the CAEME (Computer Applications in ElectroMagnetics Education) initiative. Wayne Bennett pointed out that this topic had been discussed earlier in San Diego, and that although NEEDHA would support the development of educational software, it would not be responsible for actual distribution.

Harriett Rigas discussed the IEEE Board of Director's concern about staff effectiveness. A management consulting firm, hired to recommend ways to improve staff effectiveness, had suggested that EAB be eliminated and these activities be distributed elsewhere. This in turn had given rise to concerns about the accreditation process. According to Harriett Rigas, USAB wanted to take accreditation responsibility away from EAB on the basis that EAB is dominated by academics who are accrediting their own programs. USAB wanted more industrial involvement in the accreditation process. There was also some feeling that NEEDHA did not support EAB. Harriett Rigas strongly recommended that this be countered to avoid a USAB take-over of the accreditation process. She agreed to chair a committee to draft a letter to USAB refuting the claim that NEEDHA is unhappy with EAB. She also shared her positive feelings about the IEEE influence on the Engineering Accreditation Commission and felt that a major change in the accreditation process was not in NEEDHA's best interest.

The meeting adjourned at 11:00 a.m.

7.3 Harriett Rigas passes away

Harriett Rigas, the NEEDHA Chair for 1989-90, died on July 26, 1989. She was, at the time, Professor and Chair of the Electrical Engineering Department at Michigan State University, having moved there in 1987 from the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey. She was greatly respected and admired by all who knew her for her leadership, dedication and imagination on behalf of electrical engineering education. She was a leader within ABET, the IEEE EAB and NEEDHA.

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VIII. 1989-1990 Highlights

8.0 Organization

NEEDHA officers for 1989 - 90 were:

Chairman (1989-90): Bob Sullivan (University of Florida)
Vice-Chairman (1989-90): Rod Soukup (University of Nebraska)
Secretary-Treasurer (1989-90): Keith Carver (University of Massachusetts)

8.1 Sixth Annual NEEDHA Meeting: San Juan

The sixth annual NEEDHA meeting was held at the Hotel Condado Beach in San Juan, Puerto Rico, March 9 - 13, 1990. The meeting was attended by 124 participants representing 119 departments. The meeting was opened by Chairman Bob Sullivan at 8:30 a.m. on March 10. He thanked Bob Janowiak (NEC) and his staff for their excellent work in making arrangements for the meeting and also acknowledged Harriett Rigas' plans and intentions for this meeting. He then reviewed the resolutions adopted at the San Diego meeting, noting particularly actions involving ABET, one a request that new ABET visitors first serve as observers, and another dealing with design criteria.

Chairman Sullivan introduced the NEEDHA Board of Directors, which in addition to himself included Rod Soukup, Keith Carver, Wayne Bennett, Jim Rowland, Dick Schwartz (Purdue), Pat Daniels (Seattle University) and Ed Ernst (NEC Representative). He reported that the Board of Directors met in August 1989 and proposed constitution changes to reflect the new form of the organization. [See Appendix IX for this revised constitution with additional changes approved as of March 1991.] This revised NEEDHA Constitution was approved and new officers were elected by mail vote in October 1989. He also announced that the 1989-90 NEEDHA Directory had been mailed to members, and that the 1990 departmental survey had been completed by Bill Blackwell. Another announcement was that a list of all EE PhD graduates this year had been compiled by Jerry Mendel, working with Dave Irwin and Eleanor Baum.

Ed Ernst described the NEC Workshop on Undergraduate Education held December 7 - 9, 1989 at Lake Buena Vista, Florida; Frank Barnes, Lyle Feisel, Bob Collins and Bob Sullivan presented summaries of the workshop discussions. Ed Ernst then led a discussed entitled "Roadmap for the Future of Undergraduate Education."
He presented four challenges:

  1. to create an infrastructure for engineering education to promote innovation and change,
  2. to make undergraduate engineering study more attractive,
  3. to make graduate engineering study more attractive to U.S. students, and
  4. to improve the quality and quantity of pre-college science courses.

Bob Sullivan announced that informal working sessions on a variety of issues would be held on Sunday, March 11. The Saturday meeting was adjourned at noon.

On Monday, March 12 the NEEDHA Business Meeting was held, and was called to order at 8:30 a.m. by Bob Sullivan. The main focus of this meeting was on the resolutions prepared by each of the group leaders from the Sunday working sessions. Bob Sullivan presented a resolution, adopted by the members, thanking Ed Ernst for his contributions to electrical engineering education. Pat Daniels (Seattle University) introduced a resolution, later adopted, recognizing the extraordinary contributions of Harriett Rigas to electrical and computer engineering education. Bob Sullivan introduced a resolution, adopted, thanking George Peterson for his faithful service to the electrical engineering community and his contributions to ABET's EAC.

Each of the Sunday working session group leaders then presented resolutions relating to their meetings, and each engendered discussion from the floor. It was agreed that final versions of the resolutions would be presented and voted upon during the afternoon session.

Dick Schwartz (Purdue University) introduced a resolution regarding undergraduate program requirements for the year 2000 as a topic for the next NEEDHA Annual Meeting. This was followed by a discussion from the floor about specific topics for the next meeting, particularly rewards for excellent teaching. A resolution was adopted that the central theme of the next NEEDHA meeting be on undergraduate program philosophy for the early 21st century, and assurance of adequate numbers of students in the pipeline through the PhD degree.

Another resolution was adopted directing the NEEDHA Board of Directors to establish mechanisms to gather, discuss, compare and disseminate methods of teaching evaluation to its members.

A number of addition resolutions were adopted, having to do with

  1. limiting teaching course loads for new untenured faculty,
  2. NEEDHA encouragement for industry to provide faculty research support,
  3. a NEEDHA task force to prepare a position paper advocating federal and state incentives to industry in support of engineering education,
  4. NEEDHA opposition to the new NSPE policy requiring all graduates of ABET-accredited programs to take and pass the Fundamentals of Engineering Exam,
  5. NEEDHA support for a more flexible ABET requirement of a suitable 1.5 year combination of engineering science and engineering design,
  6. the appointment of a committee to examine the requirements for accreditation by both ABET and CSAB for programs for names which include both engineering and computer science,
  7. NEEDHA support for the position that EAB, not USAB, control accreditation activities within the IEEE,
  8. the need for a NEEDHA survey of existing programs and structures relating to EE, Computer Engr. and Computer Science,
  9. NEEDHA encouragement to members to develop and use appropriate recruiting materials and procedures for attracting and retaining under-represented American-born minorities and women,
  10. that outgoing department heads or chairs who have served for five or more years be supported for a 12-month scholarly development leave,
  11. NEEDHA should require a minimum of two candidates for the position of secretary/treasurer,
  12. NEEDHA taking an active role in speaking for the needs of electrical engineering and computer engineering education to industrial, educational, governmental and profession groups, and
  13. the need for the NEEDHA Board of Directors to work with other groups on improved representation of women and minorities in engineering education.

These resolutions engendered quite lengthy discussion and the meeting was adjourned at 11:45 p.m.

The NEEDHA Annual Meeting was reconvened at 1:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 13 by Bob Sullivan. The minutes of the business meeting in Lincoln, Nebraska were approved. Bob Janowiak presented the financial report, indicating that NEEDHA had approximately $11,000 in cash at the end of 1988; a break-even budget was proposed for 1990. Bob Sullivan discussed the cost of operating NEEDHA, indicating that a substantial portion of the meeting costs (about $20,000) had been borne by NEC. Therefore, the Board of Directors had recommended that the annual dues be increased to $150; this was moved, seconded and adopted.

Rod Soukup prepared and distributed a survey about the format for the next year's meeting, and asked for efforts to prepare for this meeting with white paper drafts and group positions.

A straw vote was taken to determine the status of the number of incoming freshman admission applications. Of the 88 responses, 21 indicated no change, 12 indicated 0 - 5% up, 10 indicated 5 - 10% up, 6 indicated 0 - 5% down, and 15 indicated 5 - 10% down; 3 indicated more than 10% up and 7 indicated more than 10% down.

Another straw poll was taken to determine 1990-91 salary offers for new PhDs.
The results were compared to the previous year:

Number of Schools Salary
September 1990 September 1989
5 12 less than $36 K
3 11 $36 K - $38 K
7 15 $38 K - $40 K
17 24 $40 K - $42 K
21 0 $42 K - $44 K
21 3 $44 K - $46 K
5 1 $46 K - $48 K
0 0 more than $48 K

 

There being no further business, Chairman Bob Sullivan adjourned the sixth Annual Meeting at 4:00 p.m.

8.2 1990 NEEDHA Business Meeting at ASEE: Toronto

NEEDHA held its summer 1990 business meeting on June 26, 1990 at the ASEE Annual Meeting in Toronto. There were 41 present, representing 40 departments. The meeting was called to order at 4:30 p.m. by Chairman Bob Sullivan. The minutes of the 1990 Annual Meeting were accepted; Keith Carver gave a brief financial report, indicating that with the NEC $5000 contribution, the NEEDHA net worth was $2300 and in general accord with the budget plan presented at the San Juan meeting.

Bob Sullivan gave a brief overview of the status of the resolutions passed at the San Juan meeting, pointing out that several would require substantial time commitments on the part of NEEDHA members, and additional funding. A letter from NEEDHA thanking Ed Ernst for his service to NEEDHA and electrical engineering education has been drafted. Pat Daniels (Seattle University) reviewed progress on implementing an award in honor of Harriett Rigas; the EE division of ASEE voted June 26 1990 to contribute $2000 to this fund, and NEEDHA will seek additional funding. Bob Sullivan reviewed procedures for NEEDHA funding of this and other initiatives from member dues increases; it was agreed that the recent $50 dues increase would be used to support new initiatives such as the Rigas Award Fund and not for baseline NEEDHA expenses.

Bob Sullivan then turned over the gavel to the incoming Chairman, Rod Soukup (University of Nebraska). Rod Soukup presented an engraved silver mug to Bob Sullivan in recognition of his contributions to NEEDHA.

Rod Soukup announced that a Nominating Committee (Dave Conner, Chair; Bruce Eisenstein and Dave Irwin) would nominate at least two candidates for the Secretary-Treasurer position for 1990-91. In view of the automatic succession of officers and a two-year post-Chairman term, nominees for this post must be willing to serve a five-year term. It was noted by Chairman Soukup that the NEEDHA Board of Directors may wish to add a third candidate to the ballot, which would then be circulated to all NEEDHA members for a mail vote.

Rod Soukup asked for suggestions for the program and content of the 1991 Annual Meeting in Phoenix. Bob Janowiak (NEC) has proposed that a two-day communications forum (ComForum) be held just prior to the 1991 NEEDHA meeting in Phoenix. Rod Soukup noted that the NEEDHA Board of Directors had endorsed this proposal.

Rod Soukup reviewed the San Juan resolution for forming a committee to collect information on teaching evaluation techniques and forms, and said that he would appoint this committee. He also indicated he would appoint a committee to study and compare ABET and CSAB accreditation requirements for programs with names which include both electrical engineering and computer science.

Bob Sullivan pointed out that the proposed ComForum in Phoenix would be responsive to the San Juan resolution to increase the interaction between NEEDHA and industrial, educational, governmental and professional groups. It was suggested that a representative from the ME Department Head's association be invited to the 1991 meeting in Phoenix.

After some discussion, there was a consensus that NEEDHA should continue with both the Annual Meeting and the summer business meeting at the ASEE Annual Meeting each year.

Rod Soukup reviewed the status of the PhD Graduates Directory project, which began as an IEEE Education Society initiative under the leadership of Jerry Mendel. Marshall Molen (Tennessee Tech. University) agreed to work on this project.

The business meeting was adjourned by Chairman Soukup at 5:21 p.m.

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IX. 1990-91 Highlights

9.0 Organization

NEEDHA officers for 1990 - 91 were:

Chairman (1990-91): Rod Soukup (University of Nebraska)
Vice-Chairman (1990-91): Keith Carver (University of Massachusetts)
Secretary-Treasurer (1990-91): Mario Gonzalez (University of Texas at Austin)

9.1 Seventh Annual NEEDHA Meeting: Phoenix /Scottsdale

The seventh annual NEEDHA meeting was held March 15 - 18, 1991 at the Camelview Resort in Scottsdale, Arizona. The meeting was attended by 143 individuals, not including spouses, representing 132 departments (see Appendix V). At the opening session on March 16, attendees were welcomed by Chairman Rod Soukup.

A keynote address was given by Ray Bowen, Deputy Assistant Director for the Engineering Directorate at NSF. His address was entitled "Undergraduate Engineering Education in the 21st Century." His talk addressed a number of issues, including engineering education in the face of changing demographics, emerging technologies, and globalization; the need for broader engineering education and multi-disciplinary education; the clinical (engineering practice) side of education; ABET adaptability to competing pressures; under-representation in engineering of women, minorities and disabled persons, and the quality of the undergraduate experience.

This was followed by the reports of several NEEDHA committees, including the Teaching Evaluation Committee (chaired by Henry Domingos, Clarkson University) [11]; the Industry Cooperation Committee (chaired by Jon Bredeson, University of Alabama); and the Interaction with Other Organizations and Minority Recruiting Committee (chaired by Al Rosa, University of Denver). In addition, the Nomination Committee (chaired by Dave Conner, UAB) reported that bio-sketches for the two candidates for Secretary/Treasurer were in the conference packets. There was also a report from an ad hoc committee surveying programs in electrical engineering, computer engineering and computer science (chaired by Wilson Pearson, Clemson University). This indicated that at 87 institutions, electrical and computer engineering are in one department and computer science in a separate department; at 50 institutions, EE is in one department and CS in another; and in nine institutions, electrical engineering, computer engineering and computer science are in the same department.

The next session was a panel discussion on Future Needs in Electrical Engineering, seen from the perspective of government agencies. The panel was chaired by Irene Peden (newly appointed Director of the Electrical and Communication Systems Division at NSF); other panelists included Ken Davis (Director of the Electronics Division at ONR), Bill Raney (Special Assistant to the Office of Space Station, NASA), and Oscar Manley (Engineering Research Director, DOE).

After lunch, a NEEDHA Business Meeting was held and chaired by Rod Soukup. The two candidates for Secretary/Treasurer were introduced: Marion Hagler (Texas Tech Univ.) and Dave Kerns (Vanderbilt Univ.); because Dave Kerns was unable to attend, he was represented by Dave Irwin (Auburn Univ.). The membership voted to hold the next Annual Meeting in Hawaii. An informal survey indicated that starting salary offers for new Assistant Professors ranges from $40 K to $50 K, with the median in the $42.5 K - $45.0 K range. Bob Janowiak gave a brief financial report on NEEDHA, indicating that the NEEDHA account showed a $10,000 deficit; NEC has loaned NEEDHA $5000 interest-free. Increased dues and conference fees should lead to a positive balance.

Randy Geiger (Iowa State University), recommended that NEEDHA should come up with a plan for ranking departments, after noting that some of the current rankings take place with limited and often erroneous information. There being no second for his motion, the recommendation died.

Door prizes were awarded by Tektronix, Fluke and Hewlett Packard.

On Sunday March 17 (3 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.), five individual workshops were conducted in parallel:

  1. Demographics, the Pipeline and Admission Standards, chaired by Dan Hodge, Ohio State Univ.;
  2. Electrical Engineering of the 21st Century, chaired by Paul Penfield, MIT;
  3. Mathematics, Sciences, Social/Humanistic Issues, chaired by John Orr, Worcester Polytechnic University;
  4. University/Industry Interactions, chaired by Jon Bredeson (Univ. of Alabama); and
  5. the Role of NEEDHA revisited, chaired by Wayne Bennett (Clemson University).

At 5:00 p.m. on Sunday March 17, each workshop chairman gave a brief report, with a more complete report scheduled for the following day.

9.2 1991 NEEDHA Business Meeting at ASEE: New Orleans

The summer 1991 NEEDHA Business Meeting was held June 18, 1991 in connection with the ASEE Annual Meeting in New Orleans. Approximately 30 people were in attendance. Chairman Rod Soukup called the meeting to order at 4:00 p.m. Minutes of the NEEDHA Annual Meeting in Scottsdale were approved as circulated in advance.

Chairman Soukup then turned over to the incoming chairman, Keith Carver (University of Massachusetts). Keith Carver announced that a NEEDHA brochure was being prepared and that a NEEDHA Newsletter would be published twice per year. He also said that he would organize a comprehensive history of NEEDHA.

It was announced that the 1992 Annual Meeting would be held March 20 - 24, 1992 on the island of Hawaii at the Kona Hilton Hotel. Locations for subsequent annual meetings had not yet been determined.

Keith Carver announced plans to form the following NEEDHA standing committees:

  1. Long Range Planning Committee (Dick Schwartz, Chair; Wayne Bennett; Buck Brown; Ken Laker and Bob Janowiak);
  2. Publications Committee;
  3. Curriculum Committee (Bruce Eisenstein, Chair);
  4. Research Committee (Tim Trick, Chair);
  5. Industrial Relations Committee;
  6. Awards Committee (Bob Sullivan, Chair);
  7. Nominating Committee (Dave Conner, Chair; Bruce Eisenstein, Dave Irwin), and
  8. Women and Minorities Recruiting Committee (Al Rosa, Chair).

Members were encouraged to use e-mail to conduct NEEDHA business. Dave Conner suggested that NEC distribute, via e-mail, an updated file of e-mail addresses for NEEDHA members.

A straw poll of FY'92 departmental budgets showed that 10 were essentially unchanged, 5 were up 1% - 5%; 4 were up by more than 5%; 6 were down 1% - 5%; and 5 were down by more than 5%.

Other announcements were that

  1. an informal NEEDHA dinner meeting will be held on September 23, 1991 at the FIE Conference at Purdue University,
  2. the IEEE plans to conduct two ABET evaluation workshops next year, and
  3. Dave Conner and Dan Hodge agreed to conduct a workshop for new EE department heads at the 1992 NEEDHA Annual Meeting in Hawaii.

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X. 1991-92 Highlights

10.0 Organization

NEEDHA officers for 1991-92 were:

Chairman (1991-92): Keith R. Carver (University of Massachusetts at Amherst)
Vice-Chairman (1991-92): Mario Gonzalez (University of Texas at Austin)
Secretary-Treasurer (1991-92): Marion Hagler (Texas Tech University)

10.1 Eighth Annual NEEDHA Meeting: Kona, Hawaii

The eighth annual NEEDHA meeting was held March 20 - 24, 1992 at the Kona Hilton Hotel in Kona, Hawaii. The meeting was attended by 120 individuals, not including spouses, representing 101 departments. A list of the attendees is presented in Appendix VI.

An Administrative Workshop for New (and Not-so-New) Department Heads was held on Friday, March 20 from 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m., and was conducted by David Conner (University of Alabama at Birmingham) and Daniel Hodge (Ohio State University). The workshop, attended by approximately 30 heads, focused on management approaches, ABET accreditation issues, research program responsibilities, faculty development techniques, fiscal management, facilities and equipment, and personnel management.

A Welcome Reception was held on Friday 6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. in the Coconut Grove area of the Kona Hilton.

The meeting was formally convened on Saturday, March 21 at 8:30 a.m. by NEEDHA Chairman Keith Carver, who reviewed the meeting theme "The Electrical Engineering of the 21st Century in a Global Community." After discussing the meeting theme, Carver then introduced the Board of Directors. Vice-Chairman Mario Gonzalez presented a brief review of the program for the eighth annual meeting.

The meeting was keynoted by Joseph Bordogna, Assistant Director for the Engineering Directorate at the National Science Foundation. Bordogna began with an organizational outline of the Engineering Directorate and discussed the intellectual domain and rationale for engineering research and education. He reviewed some key issues in engineering education, and discussed his view of a changing paradigm in engineering education. He stressed that teaching and research were melding, and that the NSF Engineering Directorate was taking a more proactive role in integrating engineering research and education, and in building bridges between academe and industry.

This was followed by a Panel Discussion on EE Graduate Research - Toward Products or Process? The panel was chaired by Tim Trick (University of Illinois) and included Dave Ferry (Arizona State University), Ralph Cavin (North Carolina State University) and Paul Gray (University of California at Berkeley). Tim Trick outlined and discussed several key questions of importance to the EE research community, particularly on changes that might be expected in the next decade on the conduct of university research; the role of federal government, national labs and industry in the support and conduct of research; shifting emphasis toward short-term vs. long-term research; shifts in research directions; the impact of NSF initiatives on research; and the proper role of NEEDHA in the formulation of government policy and funding decisions. Dave Ferry reviewed some basic problems in the conduct of EE research, including the effect of declining emphasis on research at industrial labs such as Bell Labs, IBM, etc. He pointed out the need for government lab and industry collaboration for enhancing industrial competitiveness. Ralph Cavin discussed the likely research environment for the next decade from mass production to lean production, and that government research was being refocused to reflect the end of superpower confrontation. He urged NEEDHA to stimulate and support an IEEE effort to provide the public with a ten-year vision for the Electrotechnologies, and asked whether we could articulate a set of "Grand Challenges for the Electrotechnologies?" Paul Gray outlined some key factors in fostering university-industry collaboration, and discussed some basic patent and intellectual property issues. He indicated several key EECS research topics, including universal personal communications, exploitation of parallelism in computing, "soft" computing, nanostructures/nanodevices, and stimulation/visualization.

The first morning was followed by a luncheon on the Coconut Grove, and a talk on "Ethics in Engineering Education" by Professor Mike Rabins, with the Mechanical Engineering Department at Texas A&M University. Rabins discussed several basic issues in teaching engineering education and outlined a number of successful programs at various universities.

The afternoon session focused on the topic of Models of EE Education for a Global Community, particularly a comparison or U.S. and Japanese models of engineering education. These sessions were introduced by F. Karl Willenbrock (Carnegie Mellon University) who gave a brief overview of the Japanese university system in general and the post-war evolution of Japanese engineering educational system in particular.

The next speaker in this session was Seiichi Takeuchi, Corporate Senior General Manager of Sumitomo Electric Industries. Dr. Takeuchi made an extensive presentation on the professional development of engineers in Japanese industry, focusing on the roles played by both universities and industry in the education and training of Japanese engineers. He made a number of interesting comparisons between the US and Japanese job expectations for engineers, and the responsibilities of engineers.

Takeuchi's talk was followed by a presentation on "Comparisons of U.S. and Japanese Academic Systems for Educating Engineers," by Jeffrey Frey, Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Maryland. Frey, who speaks Japanese and has worked in Japan, gave a detailed description of the Japanese educational system, including the educational environment and nature of elementary/high school education, University education and post-B.S. education. He noted the distinctly different social structures in Japan (group efforts from the earliest grades, separation of task and rank, and uniformity) and of the influence of the Japanese examination system, which places emphasis on facts over analysis and allows relatively little time for critical thought. He discussed the quality pyramid of Japanese engineering education institutions, with the University of Tokyo at the top, and reviewed the EE curriculum at the University of Tokyo.

Following this talk and a coffee break, the final afternoon session of March 21 was a panel discussion on "Models of EE Education for the 21st Century," chaired by Paul Penfield (MIT) and including Joseph Goodman (Stanford University) and Michael Rabins (Texas A&M). Paul Penfield led off with a discussion of four different models of engineering education, and a summary of the dominant structures of today. He reviewed MIT's plans to combine EE and CS even more closely, to continue their emphasis on a strong doctoral program, and a proposed plan to make a 5-year Master's degree the first professional "flagship" degree. Presentations by Joseph Goodman and Michael Rabins on additional factors in EE educational models rounded out this panel.

The day's technical program was capped by a reception in the Coconut Grove, followed by a Hawaiian luau and local entertainment by island musicians and hula dancers. Sunday was reserved for rest, relaxation and tours of the Big Island.

The NEEDHA program was resumed on Monday, March 23 with NEEDHA Business Meeting that extended through the morning. Keith Carver reviewed NEEDHA activities, including the publishing of a Newsletter, a NEEDHA brochure, and a draft of a NEEDHA History. He introduced Dick Schwartz (Purdue University) who presented a report of the Long Range Planning Committee. This Committee had been charged with developing a long-range planning document that could be used as guidance to the officers and Board. Among others things, the Long Range Planning Committee recommended the formation of several standing committees: Steering Committee, Nomination Committee, Research Affairs Committee, Curriculum Affairs Committee, External Relations Committee, and an Awards Committee. A report was presented by the Nominating Committee, indicating that two Secretary-Treasurer candidates were being forwarded for consideration, Tim Trick (University of Illinois) and Buck Brown (Rose Hulman University). Both Trick and Brown presented brief remarks indicating their interest in and qualifications for being a NEEDHA officer.

At the Monday luncheon, a talk entitled "Quality, Productivity, High Velocity Performance and Global Competitiveness" was presented by James Melsa, Vice-President and General Manager of Tellabs, Inc. Melsa indicated that Quality had evolved through four eras (from Inspection to Quality Control to Quality Assurance to Strategic Quality) and noted that Strategic Quality was defined from the customer's point of view and required an organization-wide commitment linked with the strategic planning process. He also pointed out that Just-In-Time approaches to productivity improvement required a war on waste, a habit of continual improvement, and the empowerment of people. He challenged the educational community to respond to the new industrial paradigms of productivity by defining our customers, defining our concept of quality, and instituting Just-In-Time philosophies including the elimination of waste, continuous improvement and empowerment of people.

The first talk of the Monday afternoon session was by Steve Director, Dean of Engineering and ex-ECE Department Head at Carnegie Mellon University, who discussed a radically new ECE curriculum that has just been adopted at CMU. He identified the motivation for changing the curriculum as

  1. the inability to cram more supposedly "critical" topics into a four-year program,
  2. the problem of "unit creep," where faculty attempt to cram 18 units of material into 12 unit courses,
  3. the feeling that teaching "fundamentals" before engaging students in real engineering courses is no longer working,
  4. the increasing importance of interdisciplinary studies,
  5. the realization that there are more than two types (e.g. EE and CpE) of EE students and tracks, and
  6. the certainty that the half-life of what we teach is decreasing.

He discussed the new curriculum that will hopefully address many of these concerns. This curriculum would include a core of 3 required classes for all ECE majors, but would provide a spectrum of 5 different area options for the junior and senior years: physics, systems, circuits, computer hardware, and computer software. He noted that there may still be some open issues with ABET accreditation, but that they were working with ABET and felt that these could be resolved.

Next on the program was a panel discussion on the topic "What Will We Be Teaching EE's in the Year 2000?" chaired by Bruce Eisenstein (Drexel University), and including George Peterson (Morgan State University) and Mario Gonzalez (University of Texas at Austin). Bruce Eisenstein began with a review of the E4 (Enhanced Educational Experience for Engineers) innovative curriculum at Drexel University and gave an update on the progress of this experiment, now in its third year. George Peterson, representing Jim Harris of the NSF Division of Undergraduate Science, Engineering and Mathematics Education (USEME), reviewed several USEME programs including the Instrumentation and Laboratory Improvement (ILI). He indicated that USEME had several goals, including an increased percentage of short courses led by NSF-supported researchers, and the desire to reach 25% of full-time undergraduate faculty (about 130,000 nationwide) within three years, which would require a budget increase from $6 M to $15 M. He also summarized USEME areas seeking faculty proposals and the FY'93 USEME budget. Mario Gonzalez summarized an initiative in the ECE Department at the University of Texas at Austin to reduce freshman and sophomore attrition. He pointed out that the historical problems of freshmen with poor motivation, poor pre-college preparation, and no perceived ties to the department or the College in the freshman year. The objective of this NSF-funded program is to reduce freshman attrition between 15% and 25%. One element of this project has been to institute a modern freshman computer laboratory supporting standard software packages of WORKS FOR WINDOWS, MATHCAD 3.0, PSPICE, and WORD. Lessons learned to date are that

  1. there is enormous variation in student ability,
  2. students appreciate the connection between this freshman course and calculus and physics,
  3. there are misconceptions about engineering dating from high school experience,
  4. computer-based assignments are useful in focusing student attention and the creation of learning-based communities around the computer lab, and
  5. it is difficult to get faculty volunteers to teach this course.

The afternoon program was completed with a panel of NSF representatives, chaired by Irene Peden (Director, NSF Division of Electrical and Communications Systems Division, in the Engineering Directorate), Steve Wolff (Director, Division of Networking and Communications Research and Infrastructure, in the CISE Directorate), and Ed Ernst (representing Jim Harris, Director, Division of Undergraduate Science, Engineering and Mathematics Education (USEME). Irene Peden reviewed the highlights of the FY'93 $43.98 M budget request to support programs in Quantum Electronics, Waves and Beams ($11.9 M), Solid State and Microstructures ($13.8 M), Communications and Computational Systems ($8.20 M), Engineering Systems ($8.40 M), and Emerging Technologies Initiation ($1.68 M). The FY'93 Engineering Directorate plan calls for stronger emphasis on environmental research, advanced manufacturing research, ERC's, engineering education and SBIRs. Steve Wolff outlined the CISE organizational structure, which includes his Division of Networking and Communications Research and Infrastructure. He summarized major emphasis areas for FY'93 including protocol science, lightweight protocols and architectures, internetworking and protocol conversion, lightwave networks, routing and flow control in high-speed networks, network security and cryptography, network survivability and the limits of networking. Other areas of interest include bandwidth-efficient coded modulation, source coding, multi-user communication, storage channels, communication and signal processing, coding hardware interconnection, optical communication channels, and information theory. Ed Ernst, representing Jim Harris of NSF USEME, presented a review of NSF support for undergraduate education in both engineering and computer science programs. He reviewed the Instrumentation and Laboratory Improvement (ILI) program, which supports one-year lab development projects, typically at $70 K, beyond the equipment acquisition phase. Another program is the Undergraduate Course and Curriculum (UCC) development, which supports initiatives in freshman development, engineering literacy and pedagogy.

A NEEDHA banquet was held on Monday evening and was followed by an Awards Ceremony, coordinated by Bob Sullivan (Florida Institute of Technology), chairman of the NEEDHA Awards Committee. A special Certificate of Recognition award was presented to Billie Ball (Mississippi State University), in which Dave Conner (University of Alabama and Birmingham) and others reviewed Billie Ball's distinguished and record-breaking career of 28 years as Department Head at Mississippi State. A second award was presented to the ten department heads who were the original organizers of the Association of EE Department Heads (1962, see page 1 of this History): John R. Clark, L. D. Harris, Fred B. Hayes, George B. Hoadley, William L. Hughes, R. K. Moore, Glen A. Richardson, G. Dale Sheckels, Harold A Spuhler, and John G. Truxal. Accepting this award on behalf of the ten founders was Professor George B. Hoadley, retired from the faculty of North Carolina State University. A third award was presented to Wayne Bennett (Clemson University) for his outstanding contributions and dedication to NEEDHA, particularly for his organization of the 1985 and 1986 meetings in Hilton Head and NSF support. The final award was presented to Professors Eli Fromm and Robert Quinn of Drexel University, in recognition of the Enhanced Experience for Engineers Program at Drexel. Accepting on behalf of the Drexel Program was Bruce Eisenstein.

The final morning of the NEEDHA program was Tuesday, March 24 and was begun with a panel discussion chaired by Ed Ernst (University of South Carolina) on TQM for education, ABET and accreditation activities. Additional panelists were Dan Hodge (Ohio State University) and George Peterson (Morgan State University). Ed Ernst began with a review of the concepts of TQM in engineering education, pointing out that we need to identify our customers (students) and to commit to quality and continuous improvement. He noted that TQM also applied to ABET, particularly the need to identify ABET mission and customers and to identify customer needs, processes and measures. Dan Hodge reviewed the interface between the IEEE Educational Activities Board and ABET, particularly the role of the IEEE EAB Accreditation Policy Committee which Hodge chairs. George Peterson discussed several aspects of ABET criteria for engineering design and ABET initiatives to involve Deans in the orientation of EAC activities, improved training for team chairs, and a laboratory planning guide. He reviewed the proposed change in engineering design, toward "one and one-half years of engineering topics," including subjects in the engineering sciences and engineering design, and a program that includes a major meaningful design experience that builds on the fundamental material.

The final session of the NEEDHA meeting was entitled "Enrollment, the Pipeline, ... etc." and was chaired by Ken Galloway (University of Arizona) and Tom Seliga (University of Washington). Ken Galloway reviewed some recent data provided by Dick Ellis of the Engineering Manpower Commission (Washington, DC), including a chart that showed a history from 1945 - 1990 of the number of first professional degrees awarded in engineering. This indicated that a peak of approximately 78,000 degrees nationally was reached in the "baby boom" graduations of 1983 - 86, with a decrease to about 66,000 degrees by 1990 resulting from reduced interest in engineering careers. Peak engineering enrollment of 406,114 was reached in 1983, declining to 338,842 by 1990. It was demonstrated that engineering enrollments are not primarily driven by demographics, but instead are driven by student's views of the profession including factors such as job opportunities, advancement possibilities, job satisfaction, job security and starting salaries. Larry Burton addressed the issue of future engineering manpower needs, noting widely conflicting ideas about whether there would be a shortfall by the year 2000 (a NSF report by P. House predicts a 675,000 shortfall by the year 2006) or not (an article in Environmental Engineer by Arnesen stating that "there are significant surpluses and no near-term shortages are expected by anyone"). Burton summarized a Sloan Study and a Harvard Assessment Seminar Study indicating that students leave engineering because of class size, the lack of a continuous advisor, their perceived inability to interact with faculty, and excessively heavy workloads. Tom Seliga reviewed a SUP/PEE Faculty Demographic Survey, which indicates that 50% of the engineering faculty sample will reach normal retirement age in the next two decades, with a lesser fraction of the retirees occurring among current foreign faculty. This survey also indicates that among the faculty sample there were greater foreign-born engineering faculty in the junior ranks (34% of the assistant professors and 19% of the full professors). Less than 30% of the engineering faculty sample have more than five years of industrial or government experience.

The 1992 NEEDHA meeting was concluded at 12:00 noon on Tuesday, March 24.

10.2 1992 Business Meeting at ASEE: Toledo

The 1992 NEEDHA Business Meeting will be held on June 23, 1992 in Toledo, Ohio in connection with the ASEE Annual Meeting. The meeting will be from 4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. and will be followed by a reception.

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11.0 Summary of Meetings

The table below is a partial list of national meetings held by EE department heads over the past thirty years. Following the table, these locations are also shown on a map of the United States and a chart showing attendance over this thirty-year period.

Date Location Related meeting Attendance
June 20, 1963 Philadelphia ASEE 47
June 25, 1964 Orono, Maine ASEE 58
June, 1967 East Lansing, MI ASEE
June 28, 1973 Ames, Iowa ASEE 80
March 25, 1974 New York City 25
June 20, 1974 Troy, NY ASEE 34
April 7, 1975 New York City INTERCON 29
October 21, 1975 Atlanta, GA FIE 36
October 28, 1977 Champaign, IL FIE 38
June 19, 1978 Vancouver, BC ASEE 43
October 18, 1982 Columbia, SC FIE 39
October 3, 1984 Philadelphia FIE 37
March 28-29, 1985 Hilton Head, SC 72
June 19, 1985 Atlanta, GA ASEE 62
October 21, 1985 Golden, CO FIE 41
March 12, 1986 Hilton Head, SC 99
June 25, 1986 Cincinnati, OH ASEE 52
October 14, 1986 Arlington, TX FIE 40
March 15-17, 1987 Monterey, CA 117
June 24, 1987 Reno, NV ASEE 57
March 6-8, 1988 Orlando, FL 118
June 22, 1988 Portland, OR ASEE
March 19-21, 1989 San Diego, CA 160
June 28, 1989 Lincoln, Nebraska ASEE
March 9-13, 1990 San Juan, P.R. 124
June 26, 1990 Toronto, Ontario ASEE 41
March 15-18, 1991 Scottsdale, AZ 143
June 18, 1991 New Orleans, LA ASEE 30
March 20-24, 1992 Kona, Hawaii 120
June 23, 1992 Toledo, OH ASEE

 

APPENDIX I

1963 PROPOSAL TO FORM ASSOCIATION OF EE DEPT. HEADS

Department Heads February 14, 1963
Professor J. R. Clark
Department of Electrical Engineering
Michigan College of Mining and Technology
Houghton, Michigan
Professor Harold A. Spuhler
Department of Electrical Engineering
Texas Tech University
Lubbock, Texas
Professor John G. Truxal
Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute
Brooklyn, New York
Professor Glen A. Richardson
Department of Electrical Engineering
Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Worcester, MA
Professor L. D. Harris
Department of Electrical Engineering
University of Utah
Salt Lake City, Utah
Professor R. K. Moore
Center for Research in Engineering Science
University of Kansas
Lawrence, Kansas
Professor G. Dale Sheckels
Department of Electrical Engineering
University of Massachusetts
Amherst, Massachusetts
Professor Fred B. Haynes
Department of Electrical Engineering
Drexel Institute of Technology
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Gentlemen:

I apologize for being late on this report. After goading you all into getting material back to me, I dropped the ball. All of the correspondence received on this matter since my last letter has been xeroxed and is enclosed.

I would like to suggest the following as a short report of our committee to be presented to the Electrical Engineering Department Heads at the next ASEE General Meeting.

PROPOSAL FOR THE FORMATION OF AN ASSOCIATION OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT HEADS

Item 1: It is proposed that the Department Heads and Chairmen of the Electrical Engineering Departments form a national association.
Item 2: It is proposed that this association be subdivided along IEEE regions as now established with each region selecting a chairman.
Item 3: It is proposed that the regional chairman select a national chairman.
Item 4: The chairmen, regional and national, call such meetings as they think necessary when and where they think necessary giving due weight to the pressures from other Department Heads or Chairmen.
Item 5: It is suggested that the period of office for regional and national chairmen be two years.
Item 6: It is suggested that no further formal structure be defined at this time.

OBJECTIVES OF THE ASSOCIATION OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT HEADS

Item 1: Act as an advisory group on accreditation matters to the ASEE and the ECPD.
Item 2: Act an an advisory group to IEEE Professional Group on Education.
Item 3: Act an an independent group to discuss mutual problems on both a regional and national basis.
Item 4: Provide a method of dissemination of new educational methods and experiments to all participating members.

This is really all the report I can extract out of the voluminous correspondence and other mail we have had.

As chairman of this committee, I must admit a few things. The vote on IEEE versus ASEE regional arrangements was so close in favor of the IEEE that I expect we should bring it up again at the national meeting. Professor Clark voted for IEEE, Professor Truxal voted for IEEE, Professor Harris didn't care, Professor Hoadley voted as ASEE, Professor Sheckels voted for IEEE, Professor Spuhler voted for IEEE, Professor Richardson voted for ASEE, Professor Moore expressed no opinion, Professor Haynes voted for ASEE, and Professor Hughes voted for IEEE.

If you feel that there should be additional things in this report, please get it back to me immediately, and I will incorporate them in the final report. If they are of sufficient import that they should be brought before the group, I will do so before making up the final report. I am going to ask you to vote on one more thing. As chairman of this committee, I am quite concerned that we may be creating a structure which will evolve into the preservation of the status quo. I would like to write into our initial objectives those negative objectives I specified in my earlier correspondence.

Item 1: We must not become a society for the preservation of either Departments or Department Heads as they now exist.
Item 2: We must not become the society for the preservation of disciplinary boundaries as they now exist.

If you as committee members do not want these items put into the final report, then would you please vote it down in your next correspondence to me. I will abide completely by the majority vote on this matter. Let me hear from you at your early convenience. I would like to wind this matter up.

Very truly yours,
Wm. L. Hughes
Head School of Electrical Engineering

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APPENDIX II

ATTENDEES AT EE DEPARTMENT HEADS MEETING ASEE, JUNE 20, 1963, PHILADELPHIA

Name Institution Address
Anderson, Harley J. G. M. Institute Flint 2, Michigan
Armington, Ralph Univ. of Maine Orono, Maine
Boast, W. B. Iowa State University Ames, Iowa
Boudreaux, F. J. Univ. of Southwestern Louisiana Lafayette, La.
Brainerd, J. G. Univ. of Pennsylvania Philadelphia 4, Pa.
Calabrese, G. O.[12] Pennsylvania Military College Chester, Pa.
Carey, John J.[13 ] University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Mich.
Clark, John R. Michigan Tech. Houghton, Mich.
Cutler, E. C. Jr. U. S. Military Academy West Point, N.Y.
Dybosak, Z. W.[14] Tuskegee Institute Alabama
Eastman, A. V. Univ. of Washington Seattle 5, Wash.
Gamble, William H. So. Dakota State College Brookings, S. Dak.
Gray, Willard F. University of Alabama University, Ala.
Hallmark, G. D. Texas A&M Univ. College Stn., Texas
Hamilton, Howard B.[15] Univ. of Wichita Wichita 8, Kansas
Harris, H. D.[16] Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. Troy, N.Y.
Hixson, W. A. S. Dak. School of Mines & Tech. Rapid City, S. D.
Hughes, William L. Oklahoma State Univ. Stillwater, Oklahoma
Jamison, John S. Virginia Military Institute Lexington, Va.
King, Ellis F. UCLA Los Angeles 24, Calif.
Koschmann, Arnold H. Univ. of New Mexico Albuquerque, N.M.
Kravetz, Adam J.[17] University of Toronto Toronto 5, Ontario, Can.
Kreer, J. B.[18] West Virginia University Morgantown, W. Va.
Lamb, John F.[19] University of Missouri Columbia, Missouri
LePage, W. R. Syracuse University Syracuse, N. Y.
Mahrous, Haroun Pratt Institute Brooklyn 5, N. Y.
Michalowicz, J. C. Catholic University Washington 17, D.C.
Moore, R. K. Univ. of Kansas Lawrence, Kansas
Mulligan, J. H. Jr. New York University New York 53, N. Y.
Nolte, R. E. Missouri School of Mines Rolla, Mo.
Ordury, P. F. Univ. of Calif. at Santa Barbara Santa Barbara, Calif.
Paige, Arlie E. University of Denver Denver 10, Colo.
Palmer, J. D. Univ. of Oklahoma Norman, Okla.
Robinson, D. C.[20] Rochester Inst. of Technology Rochester 8, N.Y.
Romanowitz, H. Alex University of Kentucky Lexington, Ky.
Russell, F. A. Newark College of Engr. Newark 2, N.J.
Saunders, R. M. Univ. of California Berkeley 4, Calif.
Scheckels, G. Dale University of Massachusetts Amherst, Mass.
Smith, W. P. Univ. of Kansas Lawrence, Kansas
Tatum, F. W. Southern Methodist Univ. Dallas 22, Texas
Taylor, John Univ. of South Carolina Columbia, S. C.
Thompson, Trust B. Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona
Vail, Charles R. Duke University Durham, N.C.
Von Tersch, L. W. Michigan State University East Lansing, Mich.
Walsh, C. A. Manhattan College New York 71, N.Y.
Walsh, Ernest R. Howard University Washington 1, D.C.
Weaver, C. H. Auburn University Auburn, Alabama

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APPENDIX III

(compiled by David L. Johnson)

1968 LIST OF EE DEPARTMENT HEADS

Institution Location Dept. Head/Chair
Air Force Inst. of Technology Wright-Patt AFB, Ohio Fontana, R. E. (Col.)
Akron, University of Akron, Ohio Thorn, D. C.
Alabama, University of University, Alabama Lueg, R.E.
Alaska, University of College Alaska Walker, G. B.
Alaska, University of College, Alaska Tryon, John G.
Antioch College Yellow Springs, Ohio Kimball, Dean
Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona Tice, Thomas E.
Arizona, University of Tucson, Arizona Mattson, Roy H.
Arkansas, University of Fayetteville, Ark. Akhurst, Denys O.
Auburn University Auburn, Ala. Holmes, C. H.
Bradley University Peoria, Illinois Weinberg, Phillip W.
Bridgeport, University of Bridgeport, Conn. Strand, R. A.
Brigham Young University Provo, Utah Losee, F. A.
Brown University Providence, R. I. Heller, G. S.
Bucknell University Lewisburg, Penn. Walker, Ralph C.
Calif. Inst. of Technology Pasadena, Calif. Langmuir, R. V.
Calif. State Coll. Los Angeles Los Angeles, Calif Storch, Harold
Calif. State College Long Beach Long Beach, Calif. Lewis, R. C.
Calif. State Polytech. College Pomona, California Black, R. T.
Calif. State Polytech. College San Luis Obispo, Ca. Bowden, F. W.
California, University of Berkeley, Calif. Kuh, E. S.
Carnegie Institute of Tech. Pittsburgh, Penn. Williams, E. M.
Case Western Reserve Univ. Cleveland, Ohio Johnson, W. B.
Catholic Univ. of America Washington, D.C. Michalowicz, Joseph C.
Cincinnati, University of Cincinnati, Ohio Engelmann, Richard H.
Citidel, The Charleston, S. C. Herring, O. L. Jr.
City College of City Univ NY New York, NY Clemens, George J.
Clarkson College of Technology Potsdam, N. Y. Russell, J. B.
Clemson University Clemson, S. C. Wilcox, L. C.
Cleveland State University Cleveland, Ohio Schindler, R. W.
Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colo. Churchill, R. J.
Colorado, University of Boulder, Colo. Barnes, Frank S.
Columbia University New York, N. Y. Millman, Jacob
Connecticut, University of Storrs, Conn. Timoshenko, G. S.
Cooper Union School of Engrg. New York, N. Y. Sherman, Jesse B.
Cornell University Ithaca, N. Y. Carlin, H. J.
Dartmouth College Hanover, N. H. Wood, A. J.
Dayton, University of Dayton, Ohio Rose, Louis H.
Delaware, University of Newark, Delaware Young, M. G.
Denver, University of Denver, Colorado Paige, Arlie E.
Detroit, University of Detroit, Michigan J. S. Hitt
Drexel Inst. of Technology Philadelphia, Pa. Jarem, John
Duke University Durham, N. C. Wilson, Thomas G.
Ecole Polytechnique Durham, N. C. Wilson, Thomas G.
Farleigh Dickinson University Teaneck, N. J. Schick, William
Florida, University of Gainesville, Fla. Chen, W. H.
Fresno State College Fresno, Calif. Smith, J. H.
George Washington Univ. Washington, D. C. Grisamore, N. T.
Georgia Inst. of Technology Atlanta, Ga. Dasher, Benjamin J.
Hartford, University of Hartford, Conn. Alsing, C. F.
Hawaii, University of Honolulu, Hawaii Yuen, Paul C.
Houston, University of Houston, Texas Williams, Darrell R.
Howard University Washington, D. C. Samuels, J. Clifton
Idaho, University of Moscow, Idaho Parish, W. R.
Illinois Institute of Tech. Chicago, Illinois Peach, L. C.
Illinois, University of Urbana, Illinois Jordan, E. C.
Iowa State University Ames, Iowa Boast, Warren B.
Iowa, University of Iowa City, Iowa Epley, D. L.
Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, Maryland Hamburger, Ferdinand Jr.
Kansas State University Manhattan, Kansas Koepsel, Wellington W.
Kansas, University of Lawrence, Kansas Bailin, Louis L.
Kentucky, University of Lexington, Ky. Cosgriff, Robert L.
Lafayette College Easton, Pa. Conover, Lawrence J.
Lamar State College of Tech. Beaumont, Texas Cherry, Lloyd B.
Lehigh University Bethlehem, Pa. Karakash, John J.
Louisiana Polytechnic Inst. Ruston, La. Johnson, David L.
Louisiana State University University, La. Adams, Leonard C.
Louisville, University of Louisville, Kentucky Pierce, William H.
Lowell Tech. Institute Lowell, Mass. Denison, B. L.
Maine, University of Orono, Maine Gibson, R. C.
Manhattan College New York, N. Y. Welsh, C. Albert
Manitoba, University of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Can. McNath, J. P.
Marquette University Milwaukee, Wisconsin Ellithorn, Harold E.
Marquette University Milwaukee, Wisc. Lade, R. W.
Maryland, University of College Park, Md. De Claris, Nicholas
Massachusetts Inst. of Tech. Cambridge, Mass. Smullin, Louis D.
Massachusetts, University of Amherst, Mass. Sheckels, G. Dale
McGill University Montreal, Quebec Farnell, G. W.
McMaster University Hamilton, Ontario Campbell, C. K.
Merrimack College North Andover, Mass. Obryan, H. M.
Miami, University of Coral Gables, Fla. Nolte, Roger
Michigan State University East Lansing, Mich. Hedges, Harry
Michigan State University East Lansing, Mich. Hedges, Harry
Michigan Tech. University Houghton, Mich. Clark, John R.
Michigan, University of Ann Arbor, Mich. Farris, H. W.
Milwaukee School of Engr. Milwaukee, Wisconsin Lyon, T. I.
Minnesota, University of Minneapolis, Minn. Collins, Robert J.
Mississippi State University State College, Miss. Ball, Billie Joe
Mississippi, University of Univ., Mississippi Butler, Chalmers
Missouri, University of Columbia, Missouri Harbourt, C. O.
Missouri, University of, Rolla Rolla, Missouri Betten, J. Robert
Montana State University Bozeman, Montana Uhlrich, P. E.
N. Y. City Community College Brooklyn, NY DeFrance, J. J.
Nebraska, University of Lincoln, Nebraska Edison, Allen R.
Nevada, University of Reno, Nevada Manhart, Robert A.
New Hampshire, University of Durham, N. H. Murdock, J. B.
New Mexico State University Univ. Park, N. M. Brown, Harold A.
New Mexico, University of Albuquerque, N. M. Koschmann, Arnold H.
New York University New York, N. Y. Mulligan, James H.
Newark College of Engin. Newark, N. J. Russell, Frederick
North Carolina State Raleigh, N.C. Hoadley, George B.
North Dakota State Univ. Fargo, N. Dak. Anderson, Edwin M.
North Dakota, University of Grand Forks, N. D. Thomforde, Clifford J.
Northeastern University Boston, Mass. Fitzgerald, Arthur E.
Northeastern University Boston, Mass. Raemer, H. R.
Northwestern University Evanston, Illinois Murphy, Gordon J.
Norwich University Northfield, Vermont Seal, P. M.
Notre Dame, University of Notre Dame, Indiana Myers, Basil R.
Nova Scotia Technical College Halifax, Nova Scotia Bowen, Benjamin A.
Ohio Northern University Ada, Ohio Klingenberger, James L.
Ohio State University Columbus, Ohio Thurston, M. O.
Ohio University Athens, Ohio Hoffee, H. L.
Oklahoma State University Stillwater, Oklahoma Hughes, Wm. L.
Oklahoma, University of Norman, Oklahoma Zelby, Leon
Oregon State University Corvallis, Oregon Stone, Louis N.
Pennsylvania State Univ. University Park, Penn. Waynick, Arthur H.
Pennsylvania, Univ. of Philadelphia, Pa. Brainerd, John G.
Pittsburg, University of Pittsburg, Penn. Hamilton, Howard B.
PMC Colleges Chester, Penn. Kornfield, N. R.
Polytech. Inst. of Brooklyn Brooklyn, N. Y. Smith, E. J.
Pratt Institute Brooklyn, N.Y. Mahrous, Haroun
Princeton University Princeton, N. J. Van Valkenburg, M. E.
Puerto Rico, University of Mayaguez, P. R. Puig Hiran
Purdue University Lafayette, Ind. Hancock, J. C.
Queens University Kingston, Ontario Campling, C. H. R.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. Troy, N.Y. Holt, E. H.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Univ. Troy, N. Y. Arden, D. N.
Rhode Island, University of Kingston, R. I. Polk, Charles
Rice University Houston, Texas Bourne, Henry C.
Rochester, University of Rochester, NY Healy, Daniel W. Jr.
Rose Polytechnic Inst. Terre Haute, Indiana Rogers, C. C.
Rutgers, the State Univer. New Brunswick, N. J. Potter, James L.
Sacramento State College Sacramento, Calif Lux, P. A.
San Diego State College San Diego, Calif. Walling C. R.
San Jose State College San Jose, Calif. Keitel, G. H.
Santa Clara, University of Santa Clara, Calif. Dorf, Richard C.
Seattle University Seattle, Washington Wood, F. P.
South Carolina, University of Columbia, S. C. Taylor, John
South Dakota Sch. of Mines & Tech. Rapid City, S. D. Hixson, William A.
South Dakota State Univ. Brookings, S. Dak. Fitchen, F. C.
Southern Calif., Univ. of Los Angeles, Calif. Kaprielian, Z. A.
Southern Methodist University Dallas, Texas Tatum, Finley W.
Southwest Louisiana, Univ. of Lafayette, La. Boudreaux, Felix J.
St. Louis University St. Louis, Missouri Dreifke, Gerald E.
Stanford University Stanford, Calif. Linvill, J. G.
Stanford University Stanford, Calif. Pritchard, Robert L.
Stanford University Stanford, Calif. Smith, Ralph, J.
State Univ. of NY at Buffalo Buffalo, NY Fischer, Frederick P.
Stevens Inst. of Technology Hoboken, NJ Geldmacher, R. C.
Swarthmore College Swarthmore, Penn. McCrumm, J. D.
Syracuse University Syracuse, N. Y. LePage, Wilber E.
Tennessee Tech. University Cookeville, Tenn. Duke, A. L.
Tennessee, University of Knoxville, Tenn. Cromwell, Paul C.
Texas A&M University College Stn, Texas Jones, W. B. Jr.
Texas at Arlington, Univ. of Arlington, Texas Salis, A. E.
Texas at El Paso, Univ. of El Paso, Texas Nichols, Clyde R.
Texas Tech. College Lubbock, Texas Seacat, R. H.
Texas, University of Austin, Texas Straiton, A. W.
Toledo, University of Toledo, Ohio Muckenhirn, O. W.
Toronto, University of Toronto, Ont., Canada Slemon, G. R.
Trinity College Hartford, Conn. Sapega, August E.
Tufts University Medford, Mass. Howell, Alvin H.
Tulane University New Orleans, La. Cronvich, James A.
Tulsa, University of Tulsa, Oklahoma Smith, Gerald
Tuskegee Institute Tuskegee Inst., Ala. Erdey, M. R. A.
U. S. Air Force Academy U.S.A.F. Academy, Colo. Thomas, R. E.
U. S. Military Academy West Point, NY Cutler, E. C. Jr.
U. S. Naval Postgraduate Monterey, Calif. Rothauge, Charles H.
Union College Schenectady, N.Y. Russ, R. B.
Utah State University Logan, Utah Cole, Larry S.
Utah, University of Salt Lake City, Utah Grow, Richard W.
Valparaiso University Valparaiso, Indiana Shewan, William
Vanderbilt University Nashville, Tenn. Stephenson, C. V.
Vermont, University of Burlington, Vermont Roth, Wilfred
Villanova University Villanova, Penn. Hicks, J. J.
Virginia Military Inst. Lexington, Va. Jamison, John S. Jr.
Virginia Polytechnic Inst. Blacksburg, Va. Blackwell, Wm. A.
Virginia, University of Charlottesville, VA. Siegel, C. M.
Washington State Univ. Pullman, Washington Betts, Attie L.
Washington University St. Louis, Mo. Chang, William S. C.
Washington, University of Seattle, Washington Eastman, Austin V.
Waterloo, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Can. Noton, A. R. M.
Wayne State University Detroit, Mich. Brammer, Forest E.
West Virginia University Morgantown, W. Va. Jones, Edwin C.
Wichita State University Wichita, Kansas Dunn, C. H.
Wisconsin, University of Madison, Wisconsin Greiner, Richard
Wisconsin, University of Madison, Wisc. Skiles, James J.
Worcester Polytechnic Inst. Worcester, Mass. Richardson, Glen A.
Wyoming, University of Laramie, Wyoming Long, Veldon O.
Youngstown University Youngstown, Ohio Kramer, Raymond E.

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APPENDIX IV

DEPARTMENTS REPRESENTED AT FIRST HILTON HEAD NEEDHA MEETING
(MARCH 28 - 29, 1985)

Institution Location Dept. Head/Chair
Alabama, Univ. of at Birmingham Birmingham, AL Conner, David A.
Arizona State University Tempe, AZ Saeks, Richard
Arizona, Univ. of Tucson, AZ Mattson, Roy H.
Arkansas, Univ. of Fayetteville, AR Brown, William D.
Bradley University Peoria, IL Stewart, _ L.
Brigham Young University Provo, UT Chabries, Douglas
Case Western Reserve Univ. Cleveland, OH Claspy, Paul C.
Central Florida, Univ. of Cocoa Beach, FL Walker, Robert L.
Clemson University Clemson, SC Baxa, Ernst, G. Jr.
Clemson University Clemson, SC Bennett, A. Wayne
Colorado, Univ. of at Denver Denver, CO Cathey, W. Thomas
Cornell University Ithaca, NY Nichols, Benjamin
Delaware, Univ. of Newark, DE Warter, Peter J.
Drexel University Philadelphia, PA Eisenstein, Bruce A.
Drexel University Philadelphia, PA Eisenstein, Bruce A.
Florida Atlanta University Boca Raton, FL Shamash, Yacov
Florida Institute of Tech. Melbourne, FL Hadjilogiou, John
Florida Institute of Tech. Melbourne, FL Hadjilogiou, John
Gannon University Erie, PA Cultu, Mehmet
Illinois, Univ. of Urbana, IL Ernst, Edward W.
Lamar University Beaumont, TX Wakeland, _ R.
Lehigh University Bethlehem, PA Thompson,
Maine, Univ. of Orono, ME Vetelino, _ F.
Manitoba, Univ. of Winnipeg, Manitoba Yunik, M.
Maryland, Univ. of College Park, MD Davisson, Lee D.
Mercer University Macon, GA Burns, Harris
Mercer University Macon, GA Stevens, _ P.
Michigan State Univ. East Lansing, MI Goodman, Erik D.
Mississippi State University Mississippi State, MS Ball, Billie J.
Mississippi State University Mississippi State, MS Rogers, Jerry
Missouri, Univ. of, Columbia Columbia, MO Slivinsky, Charles
Missouri, Univ. of, Rolla Rolla, MO Morgan, J. Derald
North Dakota, Univ. of Grand Forks, ND Dixon, John D.
Pacific, Univ. of Stockton, CA Dunmire, Dale I.
Rochester, Univ. of Rochester, NY Shapiro, Sidney
Rose-Hulman Inst. of Tech. Terre Haute, IN Brown, Buck F.
South Carolina, Univ. of Columbia, SC Bonnell, Ronald D.
Southeastern Mass. Univ. North Dartmouth, MA Murphy, Daniel J.
Southern Methodist Univ. Dallas, TX Gupta, S. C.
SUNY Buffalo Buffalo, NY Benenson, David
Syracuse University Syracuse, NY Balabania, Norman
Syracuse University Syracuse, NY Eveleigh, Virgil W.
Temple University Philadelphia, PA Schutz, Victor K.
Tennessee, Univ. of Knoxville, TN Pace, Marshall
Toronto, Univ. of Toronto, Ontario Smith, H.W.
Virginia Polytechnic Inst. Blacksburg, VA Blackwell, W. A.
Virginia, Univ. of Charlottesville, VA White, Robert L.
Wisconsin, Univ. of, Madison Madison, WI Stremler, _ G.
Worcester Polytechnic Inst. Worcester, MA Clements, Kevin A.
Wyoming, Univ. of Laramie, WY Rhodine, Charles N.

INDUSTRY REPRESENTATIVES

Institution Location Dept. Head/Chair
Dupont Co. Wilmington, DE Dinsel, Donald
Georgia High Tech Adv. Council Atlanta, GA Morrison, Raymond
Hewlett Packard Foundation Palo Alto, CA Rogers, Emory H.
IBM T. J. Watson Res. Center Yorktown Hts, NY Bennett, Robert J.
NSF Washington, DC Cherrington, Blake
NSF Washington, DC Cherrington, Blake
Semiconductor Research Corp. Sumney
Southeaster Ctr. for EE Educ. St. Cloud, FL Everett, W. W. Jr.

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APPENDIX V

DEPARTMENTS REPRESENTED AT 1991 NEEDHA MEETING
(SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA; MARCH 15 - 18, 1991)

Institution Location Dept. Head/Chair
Akron, Univ. of Akron, OH Chen, Chiou S.
Alabama, Univ. of Tuscaloosa, AL Bredeson, Jon G.
Alabama, Univ. of, Birm. Birmingham, AL Conner, David A.
Arizona State Univ. Tempe, AZ Ferry, David K.
Arizona State Univ. Tempe, AZ Wolfe, Philip M.
Arizona, Univ. of Tucson, AZ Galloway, Kenneth F.
Arkansas, Univ. of Fayetteville, AR Brown, William D.
Auburn University Auburn, AL Irwin, J. David
Boston University Boston, MA Kincaid, Thomas G.
Brigham Young Univ. Provo, UT Comer, David J.
Bucknell University Lewisburg, PA Aburdene, Maurice F.
Cal. St. Univ., Fullerton Fullerton, CA Kwon, Young
Calif. Polytechnic St. Univ. San Luis Obispo, CA Winger, Donley J.
Calif. State Univ., Northridge Northridge, CA Prabhakar, Jagdish C.
Calif. State Univ., Sacramento Sacramento, CA Simes, James G.
Calif., Univ. of, Santa Barbara Santa Barbara, CA Laub, Alan J.
California St. Polytechnic Pomona, CA Cockrum, Richard H.
Case Western Reserve Univ. Cleveland, OH Gruber, Sheldon
Central Florida, Univ. of Orlando, FL Tzannes, Nicolaos S.
Clarkson Univ. Potsdam, NY Domingos, Henry
Clemson University Clemson, SC Bennett, A. Wayne
Clemson University Clemson, SC Pearson, L. Wilson
Cleveland State Univ. Cleveland, OH Burghart, James W.
Colorado State Univ. Fort Collins, CO Aunon, Jorge I.
Dayton, Univ. of Dayton, OH Moon, Donald L.
Denver, Univ. of Denver, CO Rosa, Albert J.
District of Columbia, Univ. Washington, DC Lakeou, Samuel
Drexel Univ. Philadelphia, PA Eisenstein, Bruce A.
Ecole Polytechnic de Montreal Montreal, Quebec Lanctot, Bernard
Florida Atlantic Univ. Boca Raton, FL Helmken, Henry
Gannon Univ. Erie, PA Hazen, Samuel L.
George Washington Univ. Washington, DC Harrington, Robert J.
Georgia Institute of Techn. Atlanta, GA Webb, Roger P.
Hartford, Univ. of West Hartford, CT Friedman, Edward L.
Houston, Univ. of Houston, TX Long, Stuart A.
Idaho, Univ. of Moscow, ID Feeley, Joseph J.
Illinois Institute of Techn. Chicago, IL Stark, Henry
Illinois, Univ. of, Chicago Chicago, IL Chen, Wai-Kai
Illinois, University of Urbana, IL Trick, Timothy N.
Illinois, University of Urbana, IL Van Valkenburg, Mac E.
Iowa State Univ. Ames, IA Geiger, Randall L.
Kansas State University Manhattan, KS Soldan, David L.
Lamar University Beaumont, TX Watt, Joseph T.
Lehigh University Bethlehem, PA Varnerin, Lawrence J.
Louisiana Tech. Univ. Ruston, LA Roemer, Louis E.
Manitoba, Univ. of Winnipeg, Manitoba Onyshko, Steve
Mankato State Univ. Mankato, MN Gruber, Carl L.
Marquette University Milwaukee, WI Niederjohn, Russell J.
Massachusetts Inst. of Tech. Cambridge, MA Penfield, Paul L.
Massachusetts Inst. of Tech. Cambridge, MA Shapiro, Jeffrey H.
Massachusetts, Univ. of Amherst, MA Carver, Keith R.
Merrimack College North Andover, MA Sifferlen, John J.
Michigan Technological Univ. Houghton, MI Soper, Jon A.
Michigan, Univ. of at Dearborn Dearborn, MI Shridhar, Malayappan
Milwaukee School of Engr. Milwaukee, WI Born, Richard C.
Minnesota, Univ. of at Duluth Duluth, MN Shehadeh, Nazmi M.
Minnesota, Univ. of Minneapolis, MN Kaveh, Mostafa
Mississippi State Univ. Mississippi State, MS Ball, Billie J.
Mississippi State Univ. Mississippi State, MS Rogers, Jerry W.
National Technological Univ. Fort Collins, CO Mattson, Roy H.
Nebraska, Univ. of Lincoln, NE Soukup, Rodney J.
Nevada, Univ. of at Reno Reno, NV Rawat, Banmali S.
New Jersey Inst. of Tech. Newark, NJ Klapper, Jacob
New Mexico State Univ. Las Cruces, NM Merrille, M. Don
New Mexico, Univ. of Albuquerque, NM Ahmed, Nasir
North Carolina A&T St. U. Greensboro, NC Foster, John
North Carolina State Univ. Raleigh, NC Cavin, Ralph K.
North Dakota State Univ. Fargo, ND Bertnolli, Edward C.
North Dakota, Univ. of Grand Forks, ND Kuruganty, Sastry
Northeastern University Boston, MA Proakis, John G.
Northwestern Univ. Evanston, IL Haddad, Abraham H.
Notre Dame, Univ. of Notre Dame, IN Berry, William B.
Oakland University Rochester, MI Kheir, Namim A.
Ohio State University Columbus, OH Hodge, Daniel B.
Ohio University Athens, OH Mitchell, Jerrel R.
Oklahoma State Univ. Stillwater, OK Baker, James E.
Oklahoma, Univ. of Norman, OK Batchman, Ted E.
Oregon State Univ. Corvallis, OR Mohler, Ronald
Pacific, University of the Stockton, CA Turpin, Richard H.
Parks College of St. Louis Univ. Cahokia, IL Schallert, William F.
Pennsylvania State Univ. State College, PA Burton, Larry C.
Pennsylvania, Univ. of Philadelphia, PA Laker, Kenneth R.
Pittsburgh, Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA Hoelzeman, Ronald G.
Pittsburgh, Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA Kamen, Edward W.
Polytechnic Univ. Brooklyn, NY Bertoni, Henry L.
Pratt Institute Brooklyn, NY Ahmad, Hamid K.
Princeton University Princeton, NJ Schwartz, Stuart C.
Princeton University Princeton, NJ Schwartz, Stuart C.
Purdue University West Lafayette, IN Schwartz, Richard J.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. Troy, NY Sanderson, Arthur C.
Rhode Island, Univ. of Kingston, RI Ohley, William J.
Rochester, Univ. of Rochester, NY Kinnen, Edwin
Rose-Hulman Inst. of Tech. Terre Haute, IN Brown, Buck F.
San Diego State Univ. San Diego, CA Marino, Leonard R.
San Diego, Univ. of San Diego, CA Kanneman, Thomas A.
San Jose State Univ. San Jose, CA Chen, Ray R.
Santa Clara Univ. Santa Clara, CA Healy, Timothy J.
Seattle Univ. Seattle, WA Daniels, Patricia D.
South Carolina, Univ. of Columbia, SC Bourkoff, Etan
South Carolina, Univ. of Columbia, SC Ernst, Edward W.
South Dakota State Univ. Brookings, SD Ellerbruch, Virgil G.
Southern Calif., Univ. of Los Angeles, CA Kuehl, Hans
Southern Illinois Univ. Edwardsville, IL Bollini, Raghupathy
Southern Methodist Univ. Dallas, TX Butler, Jerome K.
Southwestern Louisiana, Univ. Lafayette, LA Klos, William A.
St. Cloud State Univ. St. Cloud, MN Heneghan, J. Michael
Tennessee State Univ. Nashville, TN Devgan, Satinderpaul
Tennessee Technological Univ. Cookeville, TN Molen, G. Marshall
Texas Tech. Univ. Lubbock, TX Hagler, Marion O.
Texas, Univ. of, Arlington Arlington, TX Mitchell, O. Robert
Texas, Univ. of, Austin Austin, TX Gonzalez, Mario J.
Texas, Univ. of, El Paso El Paso, TX Austin, Michael E.
Texas, Univ. of, El Paso El Paso, TX Austin, Michael E.
Tri-State University Angola, IN Stoudinger, Alan R.
Tulane University New Orleans, LA Hsieh, Shieh T.
Tulsa, University of Tulsa, OK Kane, Gerald R.
U.S. Air Force Academy USAF Academy, CO Klayton, Alan R.
U.S. Military Academy West Point, NY Litynski, Daniel M.
Utah State Univ. Logan, UT Harris, Richard W.
Utah, Univ. of Salt Lake City, UT Rushforth, Craig K.
Valparaiso University Valparaiso, IN Luecke, Edgar J.
Valparaiso University Valparaiso, IN Luecke, Edgar J.
Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN Kerns, David V.
Villanova University Villanova, PA Rao, S. S.
Virginia Polytechnic Inst. Blacksburg, VA Stephenson, F. William
Virginia Tech Blacksburg, VA Blackwell, William A.
Virginia, Univ. of Charlottesville, VA Mattauch, Robert J.
Washington State University Pullman, WA Shamash, Yacov A.
Washington University St. Louis, MO Spielman, Barry E.
Washington, University of Seattle, WA Seliga, Thomas A.
Wayne State Univ. Detroit, MI Polis, Michael P.
West Virginia Inst. Tech. Montgomery, WV Crist, Stephen C.
West Virginia Univ. Morgantown, WV Nutter, Roy
Widener University Chester, PA Johnson, Alfred T.
Wisconsin, Univ. of Madison, WI Saleh, Bahaa E. A.
Wisconsin, Univ. of, Platteville Platteville, WI Shultz, Richard D.
Worcester Polytechnic Inst. Worcester, MA Orr, John A.
Wright State University Dayton, OH Shenoi, Belle A.

OTHER REPRESENTATIVES

Name Institution Address
American Electronics Assoc. Santa Clara, CA Majure, Eve
Electric Power Res. Inst. Palo Also, CA Hingorani, Narain G.
NASA HQ Washington, DC Raney, William P.
National Electr. Consort. Chicago, IL Janowiak, Robert M.
NSF Washington, DC Bowen, Raymond M.
NSF Washington, DC Peden, Irene C.
Office of Naval Research Arlington, VA Davis, Kenneth L.
U.S. Dept. of Energy Washington, DC Manley, Oscar

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APPENDIX VI

DEPARTMENTS REPRESENTED AT 1992 NEEDHA MEETING
(KONA, HAWAII; MARCH 20 - 24, 1992)

Institution Location Dept. Head/Chair
Akron, Univ. of Akron, OH Chen, C. S.
Alabama, Univ. of at Birmingham Birmingham, AL Conner, David A.
Alaska, Univ. of at Fairbanks Fairbanks, AK Aspnes, John D.
Arizona State Univ. Tempe, AR Ferry, David K.
Arkansas, Univ. of Fayetteville, AR Brown, William D.
Brigham Young University Provo, UT Comer, David J.
Bucknell University Lewisburg, PA Aburdene, Maurice F.
Calgary, Univ. of Calgary, Alberta Rangayyan, Rangaraj M
Calif. State Polytech. Univ. Pomona, CA Cockrum, Richard H.
California Poly. State Univ. San Luis Obispo, CA Winger, Donley J.
California State Univ., Fresno Fresno, CA Ibrahim, Medhat A.H.
California State Univ., Fullerton Fullerton, CA Kwon, Young D.
California State Univ., Northridge Northridge, CA Prabhakar, Jagdish C.
California, Univ. of Santa Barbara Santa Barbara, CA Laub, Alan J.
California, Univ. of, Berkeley Berkeley, CA Gray, Paul R.
Carnegie Mellon Univ. Pittsburgh, PA Thomas, Donald E.
Case Western Reserve Univ. Cleveland, OH Gruber, Sheldon
Cincinnati, Univ of Cincinnati, OH Kapoor, Vik J.
Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO Aunon, Jorge I.
Connecticut, Univ. of Storrs, CT Cheo, Peter K.
Drexel University Philadelphia, PA Eisenstein, Bruce A.
Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal Montreal, Quebec Lanctot, Bernard
Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA Webb, Roger P.
Hawaii, Univ. of Honolulu, HI Lin, Shu
Howard University Washington, DC Momoh, James A.
Idaho, Univ. of Moscow, ID Feeley, Joseph J.
Illinois Inst. of Technology Chicago, IL Stark, Henry
Illinois, Univ. of at Chicago Chicago, IL Chen, Wai-Kai
Illinois, University of Urbana, IL Trick, Timothy N.
Iowa State University Ames, IA Geiger, Randall L.
Kansas, University of Lawrence, KS Roberts, James A.
Kentucky, Univ. of Lexington, KY Nasar, Syed A.
Lafayette College Easton, PA Hornfeck, William A.
Lehigh University Bethlehem, PA Tzeng, Kenneth K.
Mankato State University Mankato, MN Mandojana, Julio C.
Massachusetts Inst. of Techn. Cambridge, MA Penfield, Paul L.
Massachusetts Inst. of Techn. Cambridge, MA Shapiro, Jeffrey H.
Massachusetts, Univ of, Amherst Amherst, MA Lewis E. Franks
Massachusetts, Univ. of Amherst Amherst, MA Keith R. Carver
Massachusetts, Univ. of, Lowell Lowell, MA Murphy, Paul J.
McGill University Montreal, Quebec Rumin, Nicholas C.
Michigan, Univ. of at Dearborn Dearborn, MI Shridhar, Malayappan
Milwaukee School of Engr. Milwaukee, WI Born, Richard C.
Mississippi State Univ. Mississippi State, MS Ball, Billie J.
Morgan State University Baltimore, MD Mack, Pamela Leigh
National Technological Univ. Fort Collins, CO Novotny, Donald W.
Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA Morgan, Michael A.
New Jersey Inst. of Technology Newark, NJ Klapper, Jacob
New Mexico State Univ. Las Cruces, NM Merrill, M. Don
New Mexico, Univ. of Albuquerque, NM Nasir. Ahmed
North Carolina State Univ. Raleigh, NC Cavin, Ralph K.
North Dakota, Univ. of Grand Forks, ND Kuruganty, Sastry
Northeastern University Boston, MA Proakis, John G.
Northern Illinois University Dekalb, IL Genis, Alan P.
Northwestern University Evanston, IL Haddad, Abraham H.
Notre Dame, Univ. of Notre Dame, IN Berry, William B.
Nova Scotia, Tech. Univ. of Halifax, Nova Scotia Baird, C. Robert
Oakland University Rochester, MI Kheir, Naim A.
Ohio Northern University Ada, OH Stahl, John P.
Ohio State University Columbus, OH Hodge, Daniel B.
Ohio University Athens, OH Mitchell,Jerrel R.
Oklahoma State University Stillwater, OK Baker, James E.
Oklahoma, University of Norman, OK Batchman, Theodore E.
Pacific, University of the Stockton, CA Turpin, Richard H.
Parks College of St. Louis Univ. Cahokia, IL Rahman, Habib
Pennsylvania State Univ. University Park, PA Burton, Larry C.
Pittsburgh, Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA Simaan, Marwan A.
Portland State University Portland, OR Schaumann, Rolf
Purdue University West Lafayette, IN Schwartz, Richard J.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Univ. Troy, NY Sanderson, Arthur C.
Rhode Island, Univ. of Kingston, RI Ohley, William J.
Rose-Hulman Inst. of Techn. Terre Haute, IN Brown, Buck F.
San Jose State University San Jose, CA Moustakas, Evan
Seattle Pacific University Seattle, WA Bauman, Edward J.
Seattle University Seattle, WA Neudorfer, Paul O.
Sherbrooke, Univ. of Sherbrooke, Quebec Michaud, Treffle
South California, Univ. of Los Angeles, CA Breuer, Melvin
South Carolina, Univ. of Columbia, SC Bourkoff, Etan
Southern California, Univ. of Los Angeles, CA Kuehl, Hans H.
Southern Methodist Univ. Dallas, TX Butler, Jerome K.
Southern Univ. & A&M College Baton Rouge, LA Cross, James E.
Southwestern Louisiana, Univ. Lafayette, LA Klos, William A.
Stanford University Stanford, CA Goodman, Joseph W.
Syracuse University Syracuse, NY Jabbour, Kamal
Tennessee State Univ. Nashville, TN Devgan, Satinderpaul S.
Texas Tech University Lubbock, TX Hagler, Marion A.
Texas, Univ. of at Austin Austin, TX Gonzalez, Mario J.
Toledo, University of Toledo, OH Lee, Kai-Fong
Tulane University New Orleans, LA Hsieh, Shieh T.
Tulsa, University of Tulsa, OK Kane, Gerald R.
U.S. Military Academy West Point, NY Litynski, Daniel M.
Utah State University Logan, UT Harris, Richard W.
Utah, University of Salt Lake City, UT Rushforth, Craig K.
Valparaiso University Valparaiso, IN Gelopulos, Demosthenes
Virginia, Univ. of Charlottesville, VA Mattauch, Robert J.
Washington State University Pullman, WA Hower, Glen L.
Washington University St. Louis, MO Spielman, Barry E.
Washington, University of Seattle, WA Seliga, Thomas A.
Wisconsin, Univ. of, Madison Madison, WI Saleh, Bahaa E.A.
Worcester Polytechnic Inst. Worcester, MA Orr, John A.
Wright State University Dayton, OH Shenoi, Belle A.

OTHER PARTICIPANTS

Institution Location Dept. Head/Chair
Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA Willenbrock, F. Karl
Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA Director, Stephen W.
Clemson University Clemson, SC Bennett, A. Wayne
Florida Institute of Technology Melbourne, FL Sullivan, Robert L.
Fluke Manufacturing Company Everitt, WA Massengale, Randy
Indiana - Purdue University Indianapolis, IN Yurtseven, H. Oner
Maryland, Univ. of College Park, MD Frey, Jeffrey
Morgan State University Baltimore, MD Peterson, George D.
National Engineering Consortium Chicago, IL Janowiak, John R.
National Engineering Consortium Chicago, IL Janowiak, Robert M.
National Engineering Consortium Chicago, IL Marek, Susan
National Science Foundation Washington, DC Bordogna, Joseph
National Science Foundation Washington, DC Peden, Irene C.
National Science Foundation Washington, DC Wolff, Stephen S.
North Carolina State Univ. Raleigh, NC Hoadley, George B.
South Carolina, Univ. of Columbia, SC Ernst, Ed
Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd. Yokahama, Japan Takeuchi, Seiichi
Tellabs, Inc. Lisle, IL Melsa, James
Texas A&M University College Station, TX Rabins, Michael J.
Virginia Tech Blacksburg, VA Blackwell, William A.

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APPENDIX VII

BYLAWS OF THE ASSOCIATION OF EE DEPARTMENT HEADS
(adopted June 18, 1975 at Fort Collins, Colorado)

ARTICLE I. Name and Purpose

Section 1. The name of this organization is the Association of Electrical Engineering Department Heads.

Section 2. The purpose of this organization is to provide means by which electrical engineering department heads in the United States and Canada can exchange information and ideas for improving the quality and effectiveness of electrical engineering education, and for the discussion of other items of concern to electrical engineering department heads.

ARTICLE II. Membership

Section 1. The head, chair person, director or other chief administrative officer (elsewhere referred to as "department head") of each department or school of electrical engineering of a recognized university or college in the United States and Canada is a member of this association, unless he requests otherwise.

ARTICLE III. Officers

Section 1. The officers shall be (1) Chairman, (2) Vice-Chairman, and (3) Secretary. Each officer shall be a member of both ASEE and IEEE.

Section 2. The officers shall serve the one year period from July 1 through June 30 of the following year.

Section 3. The Vice-Chairman shall become Chairman, and the Secretary shall become Vice-Chairman at the end of their terms of office.

Section 4. The Secretary shall be elected at the Business Meeting of the association by majority vote of those present at the meeting.

Section 5. Should an office of the association become vacant, highest ranking remaining officer may, at his discretion,
(a) leave the office unfilled until the next Business Meeting of the association, at which time, after the succession describe in Article III, Section 3, the vacant office shall be filled by majority vote of those present.
(b) Conduct an election by mail to fill the vacant office. A majority vote of those voting shall be required for election.

Section 6. The Chairman shall be the chief executive officer of the association. He shall preside over the meetings, arrange the agenda for meetings, schedule the meetings and appoint such committees as may be necessary. The Chairman will provide liaison with IEEE by serving as a member of the Educational Activities Board of that organization. The period of membership on IEEE EAB will be one year from January 1 (in the middle of his term as Chairman) until December 31.

Section 7. The Vice-Chairman shall act for the Chairman in his absence, and be responsible for such administrative assignments as are given him by the Chairman.

Section 8. The Secretary shall keep records of the activities of the association such as minutes of meetings and also shall be the financial officer of the association. He shall make a financial accounting to the association at the Business Meeting.

ARTICLE IV. Meetings

Section 1. A meeting to be designated the ANNUAL MEETING shall be at the Annual IEEE International Conference or at a time and location selected by the Chairman and not inconsistent with any vote of the Association at its Annual Meeting in the preceding year.

Section 2. A meeting to be designated the Business Meeting shall be held at the time and location of the Annual ASEE Meeting.

Section 3. Other meetings may be called by the Chairman with the concurrence of the other officers.

Section 4. A quorum shall consist of not less than twenty members.

Section 5. Each institution shall have one vote, exercised by the member from that institution or his designated alternate.

ARTICLE V. Amendments

Section 1. These bylaws may be amended by mail ballot of the members. A favorable vote from two-thirds of the members voting is necessary for amendment, provided that the total vote exceeds one-half of the membership. The deadline for receipt of the votes must be set as five weeks after the mailing to each member of a copy of the proposed amendment.

Bylaws Committee
F. W. Tatum, Chm.
George B. Hoadley
W. W. Koepsel

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APPENDIX VIII

NATIONAL ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT HEADS ASSOCIATION

CONSTITUTION

Revised June 1978
Adopted April 1979
Rev. October 1986

ARTICLE I. Name and Purpose

Section 1. The name of this organization is the National Electrical Engineering Department Heads Association.

Section 2. The purpose of this organization is to provide means by which electrical engineering department heads in the United States can:

  1. exchange information and ideas for improving the quality and effectiveness of electrical engineering education, and
  2. communicate concerns and suggestions for the improvement of electrical engineering education to:
    1. the electrical engineering profession
    2. the electrical engineering industry
    3. the institutions housing accredited electrical engineering programs, and
    4. appropriate governmental bodies.

ARTICLE II. Membership

Section 1. All electrical engineering department heads or chairman of ABET accredited electrical engineering programs (or equivalent) in the United States are Members of this Association upon application to the Executive Committee.

Section 2. Voting Members are those Members who have paid their dues for the current calendar year.

Section 3. Department heads or chairmen of electrical engineering programs seeking ABET accreditation or of programs not located in the United States may be Associate Members of this Association. Associate Membership shall be granted upon acceptance of an application to the Executive Committee. Associate Membership shall carry all privileges except that of voting.

Section 4. Industrial firms and other organizations having strong interests in electrical engineering education may be eligible for Affiliate Membership. Affiliate Membership shall be granted upon acceptance of an application to the Executive Committee. Affiliate Membership shall carry all privileges except that of voting.

ARTICLE III. Officers

Section 1. The officers shall be (1) Chairman, (2) Vice-Chairman, and (3) Secretary/Treasurer. To be eligible to hold office, a member must also be a member of the IEEE and ASEE.

Section 2. The officers shall serve the one year period from July 1 through June 30 of the following year.

Section 3.The Vice-Chairman shall become Chairman and the Secretary/Treasurer shall become Vice-Chairman at the end of their terms of office.

Section 4. The Secretary/Treasurer shall be elected at the Business Meeting of the Association by a majority vote of those present at the meeting.

Section 5. Should an office of the Association become vacant, the highest ranking remaining officer may either: (a) leave the office unfilled until the next Business Meeting of the Association, at which time, after the succession described in Article III, Section 3, the vacant office shall be filled by majority vote of those present. (b) conduct an election by mail to fill the vacant office. A majority vote of those voting shall be required for election.

Section 6. The Chairman shall be the chief executive officer of the Association. The Chairman shall preside over the meetings, arrange the agenda for business meetings, schedule the meetings, and appoint such committees as may be necessary. The Association shall request that the IEEE appoint the Chairman of the Association to serve as an ex-officio member of the IEEE Educational Activities Board.

Section 7. The Vice-Chairman shall act for the Chairman in the Chairman's absence, arrange the program of the Annual Meeting, and be responsible for such administrative assignments as are given by the Chairman.

Section 8. The Secretary/Treasurer shall keep records of the membership and of the activities of the Association such as minutes of the meetings and also shall be the financial officer of the Association. The Secretary/Treasurer shall make a financial accounting to the Association at the Business Meeting. The Secretary/Treasurer shall distribute minutes of the previous meeting along with the call for the next meeting of the Association.

ARTICLE IV. Meetings

Section 1. A meeting to be designated the Annual Meeting shall be at a time and location selected by the Chairman and not inconsistent with any vote of the Association at its Annual Meeting in the preceding year.

Section 2. A meeting to be designated the Business Meeting shall be held at the time and location of the Annual ASEE Meeting.

Section 3. Other meetings may be called by the Chairman with the concurrence of the other officers.

Section 4. A quorum shall consist of not less than twenty members.

Section 5. Each institution shall have one vote, exercised by the member from that institution or a designated alternate.

ARTICLE V. Executive Committee

Section 1. The membership of the Executive Committee shall be the three Officers of the Association, the two immediate past Chairmen of the Association, and two members-at-large appointed by the Association Chairman.

Section 2. The Executive Committee shall assist the Chairman in preparing agendas, plans and proposals to be submitted to the Association.

Section 3. The Executive Committee shall meet prior to the Annual Meeting and the Business Meeting of the Association. Additional meetings may be called at the discretion of the Chairman.

Section 4. The Executive Committee shall serve as a nominating committee for election of officers. Nominations from the floor will also be accepted.

ARTICLE VI. Dues

Section 1. The Association shall assess annual dues on a calendar year basis.

Section 2. The amount of the annual dues will be recommended to the membership by the Executive Committee at the Annual Meeting. This amount will be fixed by a majority vote of the Voting Members present at the Annual Meeting.

ARTICLE VII. Amendments

Section 1. This Constitution may be amended by mail ballot of the members. A favorable vote from two-thirds of the members voting is necessary for amendment, provided that the total vote exceeds one-half of the membership. The deadline of receipt of the votes must be set as five weeks after the mailing to each member of a copy of the proposed amendment.

Bylaws Committee, 1978
F. W. Tatum, Chairman
George B. Hoadley
W. W. Koepsel

Bylaws Committee, 1986
D. B. Hodge, Chairman
J. R. Rowland

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APPENDIX IX

NATIONAL ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT HEADS ASSOCIATION

CONSTITUTION

March 1991

ARTICLE I. Name and Purpose

Section 1. The name of this organization is the National Electrical Engineering Department Heads Association hereinafter referred to as NEEDHA.

Section 2. The purposes of NEEDHA are:

  1. To advance the fields of electrical and computer engineering and dissemination of engineering knowledge in the public interest and for the public good.
  2. To provide a forum for electrical engineering department heads (hereinafter referred to as department heads) in the United States to exchange information and ideas for improving the quality and effectiveness of electrical engineering education; and
  3. To allow the department heads to improve electrical engineering education through effective communication with:
    1. the electrical engineering profession
    2. the electrical engineering industry
    3. the institutions with accredited electrical engineering programs
    4. appropriate government agencies

ARTICLE II. Membership

Section 1. All department heads or chairmen of ABET accredited electrical engineering programs (or the equivalent) in the United States are Members of NEEDHA upon payment of dues.

Section 2. Voting Members are those Members who have paid their dues for the current calendar year.

Section 3. Department heads or chairmen of non-ABET accredited electrical engineering programs or programs not located in the United States may be Associate Members of NEEDHA. Associate Membership shall be granted upon acceptance of an application to the Board of Directors and payment of dues. Associate Membership shall carry all privileges except that of voting.

Section 4. Industrial firms and other organizations having strong interests in electrical engineering education may be eligible for Affiliate Membership. Affiliate Membership shall be granted upon acceptance of an application to the Board of Directors. Affiliate Membership shall carry all privileges except that of voting.

ARTICLE III. Officers

Section 1. The elected officers shall be (1) Chairman, (2) Vice-Chairman, (3) Secretary-Treasurer. To be eligible to hold elected office, a member must also be a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc.

Section 2. The appointed officer shall be Executive Director/assistant Treasurer.

Section 3. The officers shall serve the one year period from July 1 through June 30 of the following year.

Section 4. The Vice-Chairman shall become Chairman and the Secretary/Treasurer shall become Vice-Chairman at the end of their terms of office.

Section 5. Not less than two candidates for the office of Secretary/Treasurer shall be nominated by the NEEDHA Board of Directors. The election of the Secretary/Treasurer shall take place by mail ballot after the annual meeting.

Section 6. Should an elected office of the Association become vacant, the succession described in Article III, Section 4, shall take place immediately. With respect to the office of Secretary/Treasurer, the Chairman may either; A. Leave the office unfilled until the next Business Meeting of the Association, at which time, after the succession described in Article III, Section 4, the vacant office shall be filled by majority vote of those present. B. Conduct an election by mail to fill the vacant office. A majority vote of those voting shall be required for election.

Section 7. The Chairman shall be the chief executive officer of the Association. The Chairman shall preside over the meetings, arrange the agenda for business meetings, schedule the meetings, and appoint such committees as may be necessary. The Association shall request that the IEEE appoint the Chairman of the Association to serve as an ex-officio member of the IEEE Educational Activities Board.

Section 8. The Vice-Chairman shall act for the Chairman in the Chairman's absence, arrange the program of the Annual Meeting, and be responsible for such administrative assignments as are given by the Chairman.

Section 9. The Secretary/Treasurer shall keep records of the membership and of the activities of the Association such as minutes of meetings and also shall be the financial officer of accounting to the Association at the Business Meeting. The Secretary/Treasurer shall distribute minutes of the previous meeting along with the call for the next meeting of the Association.

Section 10. The Executive Director/assistant Treasurer shall be appointed by the Chairman to assume responsibilities for managing the day-to-day operations of NEEDHA. The Executive Director/assistant Treasurer will also be authorized to accept and expend funds on behalf of NEEDHA as approved by the Board of Directors.

ARTICLE IV. Meetings

Section 1. A meeting to be designated the Annual Meeting shall be at time and location selected by the Chairman, consistent with any vote of the Association at its Annual Meeting in the preceding year.

Section 2. A meeting to be designated the Business Meeting shall be held at the time and location of the Annual ASEE Meeting.

Section 3. Other meetings may be called by the Chairman with concurrence of the Board of Directors.

Section 4. A quorum shall consist of not less than twenty members.

Section 5. Each institution shall have one vote, exercised by the member from that institution or a designated alternate.

ARTICLE V. Board of Directors

Section 1. The membership of the Board of Directors shall be the Chairman, Vice Chairman and Secretary/Treasurer of NEEDHA, the two immediate past Chairmen of NEEDHA, and two members-at-large appointed by the NEEDHA Chairman, and a member of the National Engineering Consortium ("Consortium") board of directors appointed by the Consortium board of directors.

Section 2. The Board of Directors shall assign the Chairman in preparing agendas, plans, and proposals to be submitted to the Association.

Section 3. ANNUAL MEETING AND OTHER MEETINGS.
An annual meeting of the Board of Directors shall be held in each calendar year. Additional meetings of the Board of Directors may be called by the Chairman, or shall be called by the Chairman at the request of any five Directors. Any place, either within or without the State of Illinois, may be designated as the place for a meeting.

Section 4. NOTICE OF MEETING.
Notice of any meeting of the Board of Directors shall be given at least ten days, but not more than forty days, previously thereto by written notice delivered personally or sent by mail to each Director at his/her address as shown by the records of NEEDHA. If mailed, such notice shall be deemed to be delivered in a sealed envelope, so addressed, with postage thereon prepaid. Any Director may waive notice of any meeting. The attendance of a Director at any meeting shall constitute a waiver of notice of such meeting, except where a Director attends a meeting for the express purpose of objecting to the transaction of business because the meeting is not lawfully called or convened. The time, place, and business to be transacted at, or the purpose of, any regular or special meeting shall be specified in the notice or waiver of notice of such meeting.

Section 5. VOTING RIGHTS.
Each Director shall have one vote on all matters to be considered by the Board of Directors.

Section 6. MANNER OF ACTING.
The act of a majority of the Directors present at a meeting at which a quorum is present shall be the act of the Directors, except where otherwise provided by this Constitution or by law.

Section 7. INFORMAL ACTING BY DIRECTORS.
Any action required to be taken at a meeting of the Directors, or any other action which may be taken at a meeting of Directors, may be taken without a meeting if a consent in writing setting forth the action so taken shall be signed by all the Directors.

Section 8. QUORUM.
A majority of the elected Directors shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business at any meeting of the Directors. If less than a majority of such Directors are present at said meeting, a majority of the Directors present may adjourn the meeting without further notice.

Section 9. VACANCIES.
Any vacancy occurring in the Board of Directors caused by any manner whatsoever shall be filled by appointment by the Directors. A Director elected to fill any vacancy shall be appointed for the unexpired term for the Directorship.

Section 10. RESIGNATION.
Any Director may resign by filing a written resignation with the Secretary, but such resignation shall not relieve the Director so resigning of the obligation to return any moneys or property advanced to him by the Corporation.

Section 11. TRANSFER OF MEMBERSHIP.
Membership to the Board of Directors of the Corporation is not transferable or assignable.

Section 12. The Board of Directors shall serve as a nominating committee for election of officers. Nominations from the floor will also be accepted.

ARTICLE VI. Dues

Section 1. NEEDHA shall assess annual dues on a calendar year basis.

Section 2. The amount of the annual dues will be recommended to the membership by the Board of Directors at the Annual Meeting. This amount will be fixed by a majority vote of the Voting Members present at the Annual Meeting.

ARTICLE VII. Amendments

Section 1. This Constitution may be amended by mail ballot of the members. A favorable vote from two-thirds of the members voting is necessary for amendment, provided that the total vote exceeds one-half of the membership. The deadline of receipt of the votes must be set as five weeks after the mailing to each member of a copy of the proposed amendments.

ARTICLE VIII. Officers Authorized to Accept and Distribute Funds

The Chairman and the Treasurer shall be authorized to accept funds for NEEDHA and to distribute all funds of NEEDHA, except as otherwise specifically prohibited or limited by this constitution or by law. The Executive Director/assistant Treasurer has authority to accept and to distribute all funds of NEEDHA as approved by the Board of Directors, except as otherwise specifically prohibited or limited by this constitution or by law. The Board of Directors may authorize other officers from time to time to accept and distribute funds of NEEDHA under whatever prohibitions and limitations they deem appropriate, except as otherwise specifically prohibited or limited by this constitution or by law.

ARTICLE IX. Dissolution

Upon the dissolution of NEEDHA all funds and assets remaining are to be distributed to the Consortium. Any funds or assets so distributed to the Consortium are to be used for the furtherance of Electrical Engineering education within the framework of the Consortium's existing programs. If the Consortium is not in existence upon the dissolution of NEEDHA the remaining assets are to be distributed to the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

ARTICLE X. Distributions

Under no circumstances are any distributions to be made for the enrichment of any individual, officer, or director, other than in the normal course of businesses as reimbursement of expenses and compensation for services rendered necessary for the proper functioning of NEEDHA.

END

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INDEX OF NAMES [21]

Web editor's note: the numbers in this index refer to pages in the original printed document, and have no meaning in the Web edition. The function of an index can be achieved by using a Web browser's "Find" feature.

Aburdene, Maurice 8
Austin, Admiral 15
Ball, Billie 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 36
Barnes, Frank 2, 6, 23
Baum, Eleanor 23
Bekey, George 20
Bennett, Wayne 6, 8, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 30, 31, 36
Boast, W. B. 1
Bordogna, Joseph 6, 36
Bowen, Ray 29
Bredeson, Jon 30
Brown, Buck 17, 31, 36
Butler, C. M. 16
Butler, John 15
Carver, Keith 12, 17, 20, 22, 25, 29, 31, 36
Cash, Floyd B. 5
Chen, Wayne 2, 3, 5, 18
Cherrington, Blake 3, 6, 7, 8, 9
Clark, J. R. 1, 36
Claytor, Al 18
Clements, Kevin 17
Coates, Ben 5
Collins, Robert 21, 23
Conner, Dave 7, 11, 15, 17, 20, 25, 30, 31, 32, 36
Cotellessa, Robert 2, 4
Cruz, Jose 16, 21
Daniels, Patricia 22, 23, 25
Davidson, Ed 20
Davis. Ken 30
Dinsel, Don 8
Director, Steve 20, 34
Domingos, Henry 29
Eastman, A. V. 2
Eisenstein, Bruce 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 17, 19, 20, 31, 34
Ellerbruch, Virgil 12, 15
Ellis, Richard 36
Ernst, Ed 4, 5, 6, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 25, 35, 36
Everett, Woody 9, 18, 19
Feisel, Lyle 3, 23
Ferry, David 32
Field, John 18
Fink, Donald 5
Frey, Jeffrey 33
From, Eli 36
Gaddy, O. L. 4
Galloway, Ken 36
Geiger, Randy 30
Gelopulos, Demos 15
Gerez, Victor 18
Gonzalez, Mario 29, 31, 32, 34
Gray, Paul 32
Guarrerra, John 4
Hadjilogiou, John 7
Hagler, Marion 18, 30, 31
Harris, L. Dale 1, 36
Harris, Jim 2, 6, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 34, 35
Haynes, Fred 1, 36
Heinen, J. A. 4
Herrold, Bill 12
Hoadley, George 1, 2, 5, 36
Hodge, Dan 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 19, 30, 31, 32
Huband, Frank 12
Hughes, William 1, 2, 36
Irwin, J. David 3, 6, 16, 20, 21, 23, 30, 31
Janowiak, Robert 20, 22, 24, 25, 30, 31
Johnson, David 2, 4, 5
Jones, Al 3, 6, 7
Jones, Edwin 17
Jones, William B. 18
Jordan, Ed 4
Kahn, W. K. 4
Kamen, E. 21
Kanneman, Tom 19
Kerns, David 30
Kheir, Naim 21
Klein, Ron 18
Koepsel, W. W. 2, 5
Kopplin, J. O. 18
Laker, Ken 16, 31
LaSalle, Anita 20
Leathrum, Jim 9
Losleben, Paul 9
Luecke, Edgar 21
Lueg, Russell 7
Mackenhirn, O. William 4
Manley, Oscar 30
Marshall, Jack 21
Marton, Harold 18
Mattson, Roy 3, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 14, 20
Melsa, James 34
Mendel, Jerry 16, 20, 23, 29
Messenger, Roger 17
Molen, Marshall 29
Moore, R. K. 1, 36
Morrison, Ray 9
Nogel, Luke 17
Nolte, Roger E. 2
Orr, John 30
Paris, Demetrius 3, 5
Parrish, Ed 10, 11
Pearson, Wilson 30
Peden, Irene 5, 30, 35
Penfield, Paul 30, 33
Peterson, George 14, 16, 18, 20, 21, 23, 34, 36
Pierson, Ed 18
Polge, Bob 7
Quinn, Robert 36
Rabins, Michael 33
Raney, Bill 30
Ransdell, Gary 18
Rao, Narayana 18
Richardson, Glen 2, 5, 6, 36
Riemenschneider, Lou 11
Rigas, Harriett 12, 13, 15, 16, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 25
Roden, Martin 21
Rogers, Emory 7, 8, 9
Rosa, Al 29, 31
Rowland, Jim 10, 11, 13, 14, 17, 18, 19, 20, 22
Russell, Fred 5
Sackman, George 18
Satogopan 8
Saunders, Robert 3, 4
Schwartz, Dick 16, 22, 23, 31, 34
Seliga, Thomas 36, 37
Shaw, Len 16
Sheckels, Dale 1, 36
Siebert, Bill 16, 19
Slivinksy, Charles 14
Smiley, Diana 16
Soukup, Rod 21, 22, 24, 25, 29, 30
Splitt, Frank 21
Spuhler, Harold A. 1, 36
Steirer, William 5
Storm, Kaye 7
Strait, Bradley 9
Suh, Nam 17
Sullivan, Bob 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 29, 31, 35
Takeuchi, Seiichi 33
Tatum, F. W. "Tex" 2, 4, 5, 6
Torgerson, Paul 19
Tracy, G. F. 2
Trick, Tim 31, 32, 34
Truxal, John 1, 36
Tunis, Cy 10, 12
Van Valkenburg, Mac 2, 6
Watson, Robert 15
Weaver, Charles 1
White, Ed 9
Willenbrock, Karl 33
Wolff, Steve 35
Wong, Gene 20

--------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Footnotes

[1] memo dated Feb. 14, 1963 from William L. Hughes to organizing committee composed of J. R. Clark (Michigan College of Mining and Technology), John G. Truxal (Brooklyn Polytechnic Inst.), L. D. Harris (Univ. of Utah), George Hoadley (N. C. State College), G. Dale Sheckels (Univ. of Massachusetts), Harold A. Spuhler (Texas Tech), Glen A. Richardson (Worcester Polytechnic Inst.), R. K. Moore (Univ. of Kansas) and Fred B. Haynes (Drexel Inst. of Technology).

[2] Information provided by Billie Ball 1/6/92.

[3] private communication dated 9 January 1992.

[4] W. K. Kahn, F. W. Tatum, J. A. Heinen, C. M. Butler, J. David Irwin, D. Eitler, Charles Polk, Richard F. Schwartz, Mac Van Valkenburg, Richard W. Grow, David L. Johnson, O. William Mackenhirn, E. C. Jordan, O. L. Gaddy, F. A. Russell, R. F. Saunders, John Guarrerra, A. Uhlir Jr., B. J. Ball, R. H. Seacat, E. C. Cutler Jr., George B. Hoadley, W. W. Koepsel, S. H. Durrand, and R. F. Cotellessa.

[5] By 1977, the more commonly used name of the Association was the EE Department Head's Association (EEDHA), even though the bylaws still used the older AEEDH.

[6 ]information provided by Wayne Bennett and Roy Mattson.

[7] This paper, entitled "Guidelines for Electrical and Computer Engineering Education," was prepared by an ad hoc committee of the Southeastern Association of EE Department Heads, chaired by Wayne Bennett and adopted by SAEEDH at their annual meeting on April 20, 1985. Other members included John Hadjilogiou (FIT), Dan Hodge (Virginia Tech), Russell Lueg (Univ. of Alabama) and Bob Polge (Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville). This paper focused on the "crisis in engineering education" and offered specific guidelines for solving major problems, including appropriate faculty loads, faculty pay, travel support levels, staff support, administrative support, rates for teaching assistants, technician support for laboratories, and appropriate laboratory equipment expenditure levels.

[8] The name National Electrical Engineering Department Heads Association (NEEDHA) was formally adopted as part of the revised EEDHA Constitution, on vote of the membership at the Hilton Head II meeting in March 1986.

[9] This first EEDHA Newsletter was prepared by Jim Harris (then Chairman at Cal Poly at San Luis Obispo) and was delivered prior to the 1985 FIE meeting. It reviewed the CompMail+ system, the next annual NEEDHA meeting at Hilton Head, Kaye Storm leaving AEA, and the EE department heads survey conducted by A. L. Riemenschneider.

[10] The paper "Guidelines for Electrical and Computer Engineering Education" was formally adopted by NEEDHA in October 1985.

[11] This committee, composed of Henry Domingos (Clarkson University), Ed Pierson (Purdue University Calumet) and Mohindar Sachdev (University of Saskatchewan), distributed an excellent comprehensive Teaching Evaluation Survey report, the result of an extensive survey of teaching evaluation methods among NEEDHA members. A copy of this report is available by writing to NEEDHA, c/o IEC, 549 West Randolph Street, Suite 600, Chicago, IL 60661-2208.

[12] representing A. T. Murphy

[13] representing W. G. Dow

[14] representing M. Erdei

[15] representing C. Dunn

[16] representing Kenneth Mortenson

[17] representing G. F. Tracy

[18] representing E. C. Jones

[19] delegated representative

[20] representing Earl Moracock

[21] This index does not include names in the Appendixes.


 
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